bronchiolar collapse

bronchiolar collapse

[brong′kyələr]
Etymology: L, bronchiolus, little windpipe, conlabi, to fall
a condition in which bronchioles, which are pliable and lack cartilaginous support, become compressed by surrounding structures in the absence of inflowing air needed to keep them inflated. The condition occurs in disorders such as emphysema, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
CPAP maintains positive pressure in the airways in spontaneously breathing patients during both phases of respiration, improves alveolar ventilation and oxygenation by increasing functional residual capacity, decreases pulmonary edema, minimizes expiratory bronchiolar collapse, decreases intrapulmonary shunting, lowers upper airway resistance, stimulates lung growth, conserves surfactant, increases lung compliance and reduces obstructive apnea14.
The pursed lip breathing prolongs exhalation and thereby prevents bronchiolar collapse and air trapping.