bronchial hyperresponsiveness

(redirected from bronchial hypersensitivity)

bronchial hyperresponsiveness

A term referring to exaggerated bronchial constriction of unknown pathogenesis, which most commonly occurs in asthmatics in response to nonspecific provocation (inhalation of various bronchoconstrictors), but also to physical challenges—e.g., exercise, dry or cold air, hypertonic or hypotonic aerosols.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bronchial hyperresponsiveness

Exaggerated bronchial constriction most common in asthma, in response to nonspecific provocation, inhalation of various bronchoconstrictors, but also to physical challenges–eg, exercise, dry or cold air, hypertonic or hypotonic aerosols
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent study in Australia involving 1,600 people found that apple and pear intake was associated with a decreased risk of asthma and overall bronchial hypersensitivity. This builds upon information obtained in a previous study in the United Kingdom, where researchers surveyed nearly 600 people with asthma and 900 people without asthma.
If it is postinfectious, the next goal is to determine if it is from UACS, transient bronchial hypersensitivity, asthma exacerbation, acute bronchitis, or pertussis.
In addition, apples may be particularly protective of the lungs and have been inversely linked with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and bronchial hypersensitivity.