bronchial atresia

bron·chi·al a·tre·si·a

severe focal narrowing or obliteration of a segmental, subsegmental, or lobar bronchus, usually associated with distal air trapping and bronchial mucoid impaction distal to the obstruction.

bron·chi·al a·tre·si·a

(brongkē-ăl ă-trēzē-ă)
Severe focal narrowing or obliteration of a segmental, subsegmental, or lobar bronchus, usually associated with distal air trapping and bronchial mucoid impaction distal to the obstruction.
References in periodicals archive ?
High resolution chest CT done showed bronchial atresia of right middle and lower lobe bronchi with simultaneous hypoplasia of right middle and lower lung lobes.
Unlike the previously described thoracic abnormalities, bronchial atresia is rarely detected prenatally.
Imaging fndings of bronchial atresia in fetuses, neonates and infants.
(2),(3) Bronchial atresia and defective bronchial cartilage are common causes.
Two cases of prenatally diagnosed congenital lobar emphysema caused by lobar bronchial atresia. J Pediatr Surg 2006;41:e17-20.
Kittle, "Bronchial atresia," Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol.
Satoh et al., "Congenital bronchial atresia: radiologic findings in nine patients," Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, vol.
The natural history of bronchial atresia. Serial observation a case from birth to operative correction.
The differential diagnosis on chest radiograph includes unilateral agenesis or extrinsic pulmonary artery occlusion from tumor, pulmonary embolism, bronchial obstruction (central or extrinsic) causing compensatory emphysema, bronchial atresia, pseudo hyperlucent lung in patients after mastectomy, absence or atrophy of pectoral muscles, and shoulder girdle.
Rarer entities include congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS), congenital bronchogenic cyst, bronchial atresia, pulmonary Arterio Venous malformation (PAVM), congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, pulmonary hypoplasia-aplasia, mediastinal teratoma, and mediastinal lymphangioma.
For the purpose of this review, we will focus on the most commonly encountered lesions in our practice, which include cystic adenomatoid malformation, bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS), and bronchial atresia (BA).
(2) It presents as an echogenic lung mass during the prenatal period, and other differential diagnoses include cystic adenomatoid malformation (CAM), sequestrated lung, and tracheal or bronchial atresia. (3) At prenatal ultrasound, differentiation of the liver and bowel loops from the lung is sometimes difficult; however, at MR imaging, the liver, small intestine, and colon are differentiated from the lung by their characteristic signal intensities, and, therefore, it can differentiate CDH from other chest masses.