bromine


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bromine

 (Br) [bro´mēn]
a chemical element, atomic number 35, atomic weight 79.909. (See Appendix 6.)

bro·mine (Br),

(brō'mēn, -min),
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; atomic no. 35, atomic wt. 79.904; valences 1-7, inclusive; it unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]

bromine

/bro·mine/ (Br) (bro´mēn) a chemical element, at. no. 35.

bromine (Br)

[brō′mēn]
a corrosive, toxic red-brown liquid element of the halogen group. Its atomic number is 35; its atomic mass is 79.904. It exists naturally as a diatomic molecule, Br2. Bromine is used in industry, in photography, in the manufacture of organic chemicals and fuels, and in medications. Bromine gives off a red vapor that is extremely irritating to the eyes and the respiratory tract. Liquid bromine causes serious skin burns. Compounds of bromine have been used as sedatives, hypnotics, and analgesics and are still used in some nonprescription, over-the-counter preparations. Prolonged use of these products may cause brominism, a toxic condition characterized by acneiform eruptions, headache, loss of libido, drowsiness, and fatigue. See also bromide.

bromine

Chemistry
A halide element (atomic number 35, atomic weight 79.9), a deep reddish-brown liquid that emits a brownish vapour at room temperature, present in minute quantities in sea water and in some saline springs. 

Medical history
A bromide compound commonly used as a sedative in the 19th century.

bro·mine

(Br) (brō'mēn)
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; atomic no. 35, atomic wt. 79.904; valences 1-7, inclusive; it unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]

bro·mine

(Br) (brō'mēn)
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]

bromine (brō´mēn),

n a toxic, red-brown, liquid element of the halogen group. Bromine is widely used in industry, photography, the manufacture of organic chemicals, and pharmaceuticals.

bromine

a chemical element, atomic number 35, atomic weight 79.909, symbol Br. See Table 6.
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com)-- Demand for bromine derivatives will continue to surge owing to increasing adoption as reactants in the manufacturing of agrochemicals, water disinfectants, dyes and photographic chemicals.
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