bromegrass

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Related to brome: Brome grass, bromegrass, Bromus

bromegrass

bromusinermis.
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While constructing the English as a heterogeneous population has enabled, as we have seen, internal colonial ventures in England, these projects have undermined the welfare of the state--a condition that the stage, Tatham implies even as he praises Brome, is now powerless to rectify.
It has produced an information sheet to identify the types of brome grass, plus expected yield losses attributable to the various species.
Mean DM production rankings across WLs combined over years were tall fescue [is greater than] orchardgrass [is greater than] meadow brome [is greater than] RS-hybrid wheatgrass [is greater than] smooth brome [is greater than] perennial ryegrass.
Two other practices make it more difficult for downy brome.
KDOT uses non-native grasses like fescue and brome in urban areas because of frequent mowing.
On 12 September, members Gerald Thomas UE, Adelaide Lanktree UE and I participated at Townshippers' Day held at Brome Village, Quebec.
Russell Rice weighed in with 39 as Carleon Brome (10-1-42-3) proved the most consistent Saints bowler.
The works of Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, Brome and Heywood receive the most attention, with particularly detailed looks at Shakespeare's King Lear, Jonson's The Alchemist, Middleton's The Second Maiden's Tragedy, and the anonymously authored The Valiant Scot.
Brome and Heywood were playing on cultural as well as dramatic common ground when they added a bastard to their witchcraft play; (26) they were also reinforcing their depiction of witchcraft as a threat to patriarchal organization.
David Lukeman, 20, of Brome Hall Lane, Lapworth, committed to a young offenders' institute for six weeks for carrying a lock knife.
Stubbles are emerging from late-harvested cereals bright green with bindweed, germinating grain, black-grass and, on the headlands, sterile brome.
Tom Kay of the Institute for Applied Ecology will speak about False Brome and other non-native plants, and Sheila Klest of Trillium Gardens will discuss native plants.