broadside


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broadside

A separately published piece of paper, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded, which is posted, publicly distributed or sold—e.g., proclamations, handbills, newsheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
To advocate her position on gender bias, Williams also neglects to point out the discrepancies between the prevalent depictions of women burned at the stake for witchcraft and domestic crime in broadside ballads and the historical records.
She does so through close-reading of broadsides, especially commenting on ballad writers' consultation of court trials and confessions.
Thirty years later, they collaborated on a collection of the city's broadsides, Manchester Ballads (1983).
"In a perfect world, then, I'd always take my bow shots at deer when they're standing broadside. Of course, in real life it isn't always quite like that.
In 1965, using $12 from his own pocket, he founded Broadside Press.
And as we know, the fundamental broadside mode of the cylindrical DRA is [HEM.sub.111] mode [5].
In fact, the idea was hatched at a small memorial for children's writer Beverly Allenson, a Broadside collective member who recently passed away.
* An American broadside description of the Battle of Bunker Hill.
Many of the now 133 broadsides are breathtakingly beautiful and have incorporated lines from the poet al-Mutanabbi's verse or poems by contemporary Iraqi and American poets.
Thus by etching SRRs on both sides of a thin dielectric slab, the distributed capacitance between the rings can be significantly enhanced owing to the broadside coupling [11] which results in a lower resonant frequency compared to the edge-coupled SRRs.
The broadside follows Seoul's accusation that North Korea blew up and sank naval ship, "Cheonan" on March 26 this year.
Perhaps sensing what Perloff later observes about the materiality lacking in free verse poetry of the fifties and sixties, Baskin's broadside printing adds textured, physical interest to poetry during that period.