broad host range

broad host range

A term of art referring to an organism’s ability to infect and reproduce in wide range of organisms.
 
Examples
Phages or plasmids that can grow in many different bacterial species, or bacteria which are pathogenic in a range of eukaryotic hosts.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Naturally, if the soil is in good condition, it is less exposed to inorganic chemicals, then there is a bigger chance that we can get EPN," Pascual said.Pascual added that EPNs possess a unique combination of attributes such as broad host range, high virulence, long term efficacy, easy application, easy mass production, compatibility with most chemicals.
It has a broad host range, having been recorded on species of over 60 plant families (Blackman and Eastop, 2006), affect various field crops, fruits and vegetables as sucking pests (Aheer et al., 2008; Arshad et al., 2017).
While there are hundreds of plant pests and diseases currently of concern, "Xylella is in a bit of a class of its own, because it kills plants, has insect vectors and such a broad host range", he said.
New hepatitis B virus of cranes that has an unexpected broad host range. J Virol.
citri has a fairly broad host range within the Rutaceae, we postulated that detoxifying enzyme levels may vary as a result of rearing D.
However, this replicon has a broad host range. Plasmids with this replicon can replicate in many Gram-positive bacteria, such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Streptococcus thermophilus.
Typhimurium infections are less susceptible to traditional antibiotics, which is concerning in light of this pathogen's broad host range and potential to spread antibiotic resistance determinants to other bacteria.
But the broad host range of the virus, coupled with the large kills, suggests strong actions are needed to prevent this virus from moving into other populations.
Their sensitivity against three phages indicated broad host range of phages SANF and SA2, and relatively narrow host range of phage SA.
However, because of its broad host range (De Santis 1967), this parasitoid was dropped from further consideration as a potential biological control agent in North America (Pemberton & Cordo 2001).
Especially given the broad host range of vaccinia, these findings warrant a substantial effort to characterize further the circulation of vaccinia virus in this region.
Many human pathogens inhabit several animal host and environmental reservoirs, and a broad host range is particularly characteristic of emerging diseases (1).