brittle


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brittle

/brit·tle/ (brit´'l)
1. easily broken, snapped, or cracked, especially under slight pressure.
2. easily disrupted.
References in classic literature ?
I'm not so brittle as you think," retorted the cat.
He knew the cold-blooded insincerity of them, for, at night, when he was brought to Del Mar's room, he heard only the cold brittle tones, sensed only the threat and the menace of the other's personality, felt, when touched by the other's hand, only a stiffness and sharpness of contact that was like to so much steel or wood in so far as all subtle tenderness of heart and spirit was absent.
I shouldn't wonder if it was,' exclaimed Brittles, catching at the idea.
Giles acted in the double capacity of butler and steward to the old lady of the mansion; Brittles was a lad of all-work: who, having entered her service a mere child, was treated as a promising young boy still, though he was something past thirty.
Giles, Brittles, and the tinker, were recruiting themselves, after the fatigues and terrors of the night, with tea and sundries, in the kitchen.
At this point of the narrative the cook turned pale, and asked the housemaid to shut the door: who asked Brittles, who asked the tinker, who pretended not to hear.
More like the noise of powdering a iron bar on a nutmeg-grater,' suggested Brittles.
I'll call up that poor lad, Brittles, and save him from being murdered in his bed; or his throat," I says, "may be cut from his right ear to his left, without his ever knowing it.
Here, all eyes were turned upon Brittles, who fixed his upon the speaker, and stared at him, with his mouth wide open, and his face expressive of the most unmitigated horror.
We're dead men, I think, Brittles," I says,' continued Giles;
You're a woman,' retorted Brittles, plucking up a little.
If Brittles would rather open the door, in the presence of witnesses,' said Mr.