table

(redirected from bring to the table)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

table

 [ta´b'l]
a flat layer or surface.
cohort life table a life table giving the survival data of a cohort of individuals in a clinical study or trial, i.e., the number alive and under observation (not lost to follow-up) at the beginning of each year, the number dying in each year, the number lost to follow-up each year, the conditional probability of survival for each year, and the cumulative probabilities of survival from the beginning of the study to the end of each year.
inner table the inner compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
life table any of various tables describing mortality and survival data for groups of individuals at specific times or over defined intervals; tables may summarize combined mortality experience by age over a brief period or may follow a cohort over time (cohort life table).
outer table the outer compact layer of the bones covering the brain.
tilt table a plinth, equipped with a footboard for support, to which a patient can be strapped for rotation to a nearly upright position; used in cases of spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders to enhance blood circulation to the lower limbs, improve posture, and aid in muscle training and sense of balance.
vitreous table inner table.

ta·ble

(tā'bĕl),
1. One of the two plates or laminae, separated by the diploë, into which the cranial bones are divided.
2. An arrangement of data in parallel columns, showing the essential facts in a readily appreciable form.
3. A platform on which items can be placed.
[L. tabula]

table

Epidemiology A set of data arranged in rows and columns. See Contingency table, Evidence table, Increment-decrement life table, Life table, Metropolitan Life table Surgery The slab on which a Pt is placed to perform an operation.

ta·ble

(tā'bĕl)
1. One of the two plates or laminae, separated by the diploë, into which the cranial bones are divided.
2. An arrangement of data in parallel columns, showing the essential facts in a readily appreciable form.
3. Any flat-surfaced structure that serves as furniture.
[L. tabula]

ta·ble

(tā'bĕl)
1. One of the two plates or laminae, separated by the diploë, into which the cranial bones are divided.
2. A platform on which items (e.g., dental tools) can be placed.
[L. tabula]
References in periodicals archive ?
"I can't tell you what a feeling it is to actually have something to bring to the table and not have bills that I need a man to help me with."
"We need quality deals to bring to the table," says Gregory Jackson, owner of Prestige Automotive Group in Mount Morris, Michigan.
"It is the hard work and innovative spirit all of you bring to the table that allows us to add value to our services, to find new ways to improve efficiency and to reduce our costs and yours."
Additionally, adds Thomas-Graham analogies from other industries are relevant, and that's what consulting can bring to the table that corporate insiders cannot always bring--breadth of knowledge.
"The network of local providers we bring to the table has been a key to servicing the Fleming account," Fisk said.
"There are very few people who bring to the table what Jeffrey does," agrees Larry Back, director of Property Management for Insignia/ESG, a Richmond, VA-based company which manages and/or leases 175 million square feet of real estate, much of it in New York.
Government and business each bring to the table a unique perspective as to the best course of action for these programs, which as a result has created mutually beneficial goals.
"Our interest in the creation of the merged firm is to bring to the table a New York City based mega-firm that has the clear, professional capability of representing the major REITs at their nationwide locations with the same expertise that we bring to the mega-owners in New York City," he said.
"We are an additional service brokers can bring to the table," adds Donohue.
"We're another service brokers can bring to the table. By helping brokers serve their clients, we build good will for the future," says Arcoro.
"What I bring to the table is someone who's had over 20 years of acquisition, leasing, and hands on experience in turning around properties," he said.