briefing

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briefing

(brēf′ing)
A short session of instruction or preparation for a person, crew, or staff on how to accomplish an upcoming operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
com/story/opinion/2016/12/08/donald-trump-diplomacy-phone-calls-constitution-column/95094374/) USA Today of their concerns about Trump's lack of interest in receiving briefings more frequently.
One of the mildly entertaining but substantively useless sideshows in Washington is the daily briefing for reporters at the White House.
Team briefing originated in the 1960s when companies developed briefing groups which cascaded information through the organisation.
With the present acquisition, Briefings publisher William G.
This briefing will be led by Liverpool Football Club's brand director Davide De Maestri.
In addition to being a written reinforcement of the crisis negotiation coordinator's oral briefing to the on-scene commander, NPPs also can enable the on-scene commander to brief those higher in the chain of command.
To remedy this problem, and to ensure that every IMS receives the same baseline pre-departure information, a standardized and easily distributable briefing needed to be developed.
The purpose of this exercise is to give you a feeling for White House briefings as a news source, and to follow the raw information from the White House into the media.
I knew what this meant: My morning briefing would be war.
Bulletin Healthcare Briefings, a subsidiary of Bulletin News, LLC, partners with 25 of the nation's top medical associations and partners to bring their physician/HCP members and affiliates customized daily electronic news briefings that succinctly summarize the most medically-relevant news from the previous 24 hours.
Briefings properties include nine business management newsletters, including Communications Briefings, American Speaker and Manager's Edge, as well as a library of related books, videos and training materials.
My major problem with the effort from Briefings is that the one sheet contains just too many numbers--almost bound to confuse many prospects.