bridle

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bri·dle

(brī'dil),
1. Synonym(s): frenum
2. A band of fibrous material stretching across the surface of an ulcer or other lesion or forming adhesions between opposing serous or mucous surfaces.
[M.E. bridel]
References in classic literature ?
Here I am, a thirty times over millionaire, slaving harder every day than any dozen men that work for me, and all I get is two meals that don't taste good, one bed, a quart of Martini, and a hundred and forty hair bridles to look at on the wall.
An hostler stood near, holding by the bridle another immense horse--apparently a near relative of the animal in the chaise--ready saddled for Mr.
cried Porthos, almost choked with dust and chewing his bridle as a horse chews his bit.
It is easy for the guide to let his bridle be--he is accustomed to place himself in that helpless position under stress of circumstances, and he knows exactly what his pony can do.
I had of course long been used to a halter and a headstall, and to be led about in the fields and lanes quietly, but now I was to have a bit and bridle; my master gave me some oats as usual, and after a good deal of coaxing he got the bit into my mouth, and the bridle fixed, but it was a nasty thing
I shall answer no questions till you let go the bridle, - if you stand till morning.
Don Quixote was mightily provoked by this answer, and seizing the mule by the bridle he said, "Halt, and be more mannerly, and render an account of what I have asked of you; else, take my defiance to combat, all of you.
Take you his bridle and let us do honor to the guest who has come to feast with us.
It required only one glance to assure him that these were the equipages he was in search of; he therefore turned his bridle, and rode back to the king.
Quasimodo, far from releasing the bridle, prepared to force him to retrace his steps.
As soon as the horse touched the bottom on the other side, the man pulled himself on, and was firmly seated, bridle in hand, before the horse gained the bank.
Therefore there is no better way, to moderate suspicions, than to account upon such suspicions as true, and yet to bridle them as false.