bridge to transplant


Also found in: Acronyms.

bridge to transplant

A generic term for any organ or surrogate device used to stabilise a patient before definitive transplantation of a matched organ.

Organ bridges may be
• Synthetic—e.g., AbioCor, an artificial heart;
• Nonhuman—e.g., pig liver;
• Organ surrogate—e.g., haemodialysis before kidney transplantation.
References in periodicals archive ?
TIPS can effectively reduce portal hypertension and serve as a bridge to transplant, but hepatic vein recanalization is the first-line endovascular treatment of choice.
Further demographics, including diagnosis and rates of successful bridge to transplant, are described in Table 1.
Shortened to CHUF, the charity was established to maintain the Children's Heart Unit at the Freeman Hospital as one of the foremost specialist children's transplant and bridge to transplant centres.
Once approved, the HDEs will allow up to 4,000 US patients annually to receive the 50cc TAH as destination therapy, and an additional 4,000 pediatric patients to receive the device as a bridge to transplant.
Originally used as a permanent replacement heart, the SyncardiaTAH is currently approved as a bridge to transplant for people suffering from end-stage heart failure affecting both sides of the heart (biventricular failure).
The heart is pneumatically driven by precisely calibrated pulses of air and vacuum and is approved as a bridge to transplant for patients suffering from end-stage heart failure affecting both sides of the heart (biventricular failure) who might die before a donor heart becomes available.
I worked on the cardio-thoracic step-down unit in the mid-'90s when persons with LVADs remained hospitalized as the device was "a bridge to transplant." With increased and longer-term use of these devices has come more complex ethical considerations--as Dr.
Patients using LVAD or TAH as a bridge to transplant have improved survival to and after heart transplantation, improving utilization of donor hearts.
Although the current clinical trial is evaluating the Levacor VAD as a bridge to transplant, the device is expected to be evaluated next as an alternative to heart transplant and may one day serve as a bridge to heart recovery, said Selzman.
Leerink Swann analyst Rick Wise pegged the market for the new use at $2.5 billion, compared with just $250 million for patients using the device as a bridge to transplant.
"LVADs have allowed us to support patients until they can receive a heart transplant, so they are called a bridge to transplant," said Gregory Ewald, Washington University cardiologist.