marriage

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mar·riage

gamophobia.

marriage

The legal joining of two adults.
References in periodicals archive ?
In all such statements and documents, by those who defend the bride price and those who attack it, by ni-Vanuatu themselves and by foreign commentators in places like Canberra and Geneva, there is a pervasive, shared set of binaries--between gifts and commodities, between women as persons of value in local kinship exchanges and women as being like things with a price tag, between women as agents of benign customary practices and women as victims of commoditisation, violence, and invented traditions.
Bride price and the establishment of a home were fundamental to the practice of marriage.
These issues need to be understood in the context of Emecheta's Bride Price. According to Michael C.
Social customs are here enforced by the fact that her father may not want to refund his son-in-law with the heavy bride price he has pocketed, to which may be furthermore added the expenses of the wedding ceremony (sacrificed pig and chickens provided or paid by the son-in-law).
We need those in authority to take the law more seriously, but change will happen fastest when communities recognize that the economic and social value of educating girls outweighs their bride price. This requires sensitive debate, thoughtful leadership, and financial assistance to keep girls in school.
"Today, even reasonable boys pay just $50 bride price and a copy of the holy Koran after making the girl pregnant or seeing her secretly for months."
Why do our parliamentarians not come up with a legislation to say the bride price for every bride will be so much say R10000 or so or even abolish the whole idea of lobola?
But South African media reported that he had also paid lobolo (bride price) for two other women.
It further explores issues such as 'bride price', legislation pertaining to marriage and maternity.
Early marriage of girls, because of cultural pressure or economic desperation (prospective husbands must provide the family with a "bride price"), either cuts short their education, or makes it seem not worthwhile to the family.
I am pleased to see that even though they are still treated as chattel with a "bride price," their native "beauty contests" value knowledge of traditions and culture above physical allure.
They are often sold into marriage for a so- called "bride price" before completing secondary school.