brief

(redirected from brevity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to brevity: levity

brief

(bref) [Fr. bref fr L. brevis, short, brief, a catalogue]
1. A condensed legal argument in legal format and style.
2. A written or spoken summary of an important or complex topic; an abstract.
3. To make a written or spoken summary of.
4. To conduct a short session of instruction or preparation for a person, crew, or staff on how to accomplish an upcoming operation.
See: debrief
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Brevity's product was not born overnight, it took years of trial and error to create their formula, but the byproduct is an innovative service that produces results.
AllDigital Brevity is sold as a subscription service that can be deployed across a number of configurations including virtual machines in the cloud, on-prem hardware, and other networked facilities.
Talking to private news channel, all-rounder Afridi who retired from one day cricket after World Cup said that he endorses brevity in players more than technique.
Truly unbeatable, concise brevity, preached my first editor, was to be found in the sentence "Jesus wept", contained in the Gospel of St John (Chap.
Brevity is hardly their watchword, but Einstellung's songs are so seismic and skull-rattlingly intense, you almost didn't want them to end
But as dance critics or reviewers--and most of us play both roles at different times-we all have problems in describings things, or our reaction to things, that do not lend themselves to description, and certainly not to brevity. As a result, virtually every reviewer/critic has a whole arsenal of "hooray" or "boo" words, which really mean very little in themselves and owe their value to how much the reader credits their source.
The editorial staff" reserves the right to edit all letters for brevity and clarity.
This column has a penchant for architectural websites which exhibit clarity, brevity and the odd quirk.
To the Editor: We were surprised and disappointed by the brevity of your article commemorating the 60th anniversary of the establishment of the Communicable Disease Center (CDC) (1).
The brevity of this book means that many of Jarl's summaries are so concise that many will find them unhelpful.
Though it is difficult to determine the exact audience for this book, particularly since its brevity makes it helpful if the reader has a solid background in either history or policy studies, it does seem to be geared chiefly for those who are familiar with public policy.