bretylium


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bretylium

 [brĕ-til´e-um]
an adrenergic blocking agent used in the form of the tosylate salt to control arrhythmias in certain cases of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation; administered by intravenous or intramuscular injection.

bre·tyl·i·um

(bre-til'ē-ŭm),
An antiarrhythmic used to treat life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Initially releases norepinephrine, then blocks its reuptake, thus depressing excitability of sympathetic nerve terminals.

bre·tyl·i·um

(bre-til'ē-ŭm)
An antiarrhythmic used to treat life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Initially releases norepinephrine, thenblocks its reuptake, thus depressing excitability of sympathetic nerve terminals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Banking News-January 10, 2019-Pii wins US FDA's approval for Bretylium Tosylate Injection for ventricular fibrillation
M2 EQUITYBITES-January 10, 2019-Academic Pharmaceuticals receives FDA approval for Bretylium Tosylate Injection
M2 PHARMA-January 10, 2019-Pii wins US FDA's approval for Bretylium Tosylate Injection for ventricular fibrillation
Academic Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a partner with Hunt Valley-based Pharmaceutics International Inc., received FDA approval to develop Bretylium Tosylate Injection USP, 500 mg/10 mL (50 mg/mL) Single-Dose Vials.
Similarly, the alpha-blocking properties of bretylium might be additive to those of LATUDA, resulting in problematic hypotension.
* Other drugs like bretylium or amiodarone may be used; however IV amiodarone has been shown to be as effective as bretylium with added advantage of less hypotension as compared to IV bretylium.
Bretylium (an adrenergic neurone blocking agent used to treat ventricular fibrillation) may facilitate cardioversion.
Voltage gated potassium (Kv) channels in the myocardium are blocked by class III antiarrhythmic drugs like amiodarone and bretylium. These are effective in improving survival and reducing the incidence of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation (52).
Consider use of fluids and the following drugs during CPCR: atropine, epinephrine, 2 percent lidocaine, naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, and bretylium.
A number of specific therapies have been proposed over the years including bretylium, glucose/insulin/potassium infusions and cardiopulmonary bypass (1-2,5).
drugs, all in prefilled syringes: Dextrose, 50 percent; Sodium Bicarbonate; Bretylium Tosylate; Atropine, Epinephrine 1:10,000; Lidocaine, 2 percent; and Dextrose, 5 percent.
The Vaughan Williams classification of antiarrhythmics and examples of representative agents are as follows (although, as discussed elsewhere (5), this classification has certain limitations): class I, [Na.sup.+] -channel blockade (Harrison's modification (6) further divides this class of antiarrhythmics into three subclasses: IA (quinidine and procainamide), IB (lidocaine and phenytoin), and IC (flecainide)); class II, [beta]-adrenergic blockade, propranolol; class III, prolonged repolarization, amiodarone (Cordarone) or bretylium (Bretylol); class IV, [Ca.sup.2+]-channel blockade, verapamil or diltiazem; class V, altering cell membrane responsiveness, digoxin and atropine.