bremsstrahlung


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brems·strah·lung

(bremz'strah-lŭng),
Continuous spectrum radiation produced by the slowing of electrons in a beam by nuclei in their vicinity.
[Ger. Bremsstrahlung, braking radiation]

bremsstrahlung

German: braking radiation. A broad spectrum—rather than an energy peak of electromagnetic radiation resulting from the rapid deceleration of a charged particle—photon or electron when it hits the electron cloud of an atom’s nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 2: Postinjection Bremsstrahlung imaging by brain Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT).
(9.) Bremsstrahlung: German term for "Braking radiation." Electromagneticradiation from a charged particle as it slows down (decelerates) or as it changes direction due to near collisions with other particles.
Shooting a beam of high-energy electrons at a tungsten target produces bremsstrahlung. The bremsstrahlung photons then rip apart deuterium, releasing neutrons.
This is not enough energy to eject a shell electron for characteristic x-rays or for [E.sub.max] for bremsstrahlung.
Smirnov, "Loopy constraints on leptophilic dark matter and internal bremsstrahlung," Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, vol.
The ionization due to photons emitted by radiative processes (i.e., bremsstrahlung and fluorescence photons) is not to be included in dg.
Anomalous microwave emission is often discussed in the context of the three major radio emission mechanisms: synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, and thermal (i.e., vibrational) dust emission.
Free-free processes are inverse Bremsstrahlung mechanisms, whereby a free electron and an ion interact during which time the combined species is able to absorb a photon [41, p.138].
Accelerators with high photon flux require a high-Z material, typically tungsten, for the bremsstrahlung target because it can withstand the high heat from the electron beam.
Such high-energy photons are typically the result of bremsstrahlung, a process that takes its name from the German words for "braking radiation." When a high-speed electron slams into a much heavier atom, the kinetic energy shed during the electron's sudden deceleration is east off in a photon, says Smith.
This results in the emission of high-energy, X-ray photons by a process called bremsstrahlung (a German word meaning "braking radiation").