breed

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Related to breeds: Cat breeds, Dairy breeds

breed

(brēd)
v. bred (brĕd), breeding, breeds
v.tr.
1. To produce (offspring); give birth to or hatch.
2.
a. To cause to reproduce, especially by controlled mating and selection: breed cattle.
b. To develop new or improved strains in (organisms), chiefly through controlled mating and selection of offspring for desirable traits.
c. To inseminate or impregnate; mate with.
v.intr.
1. To produce offspring.
2. To copulate; mate.
n.
A group of organisms having common ancestors and certain distinguishable characteristics, especially a group within a species developed by artificial selection and maintained by controlled propagation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

breed

noun A race or variety of animals or plants related by descent from common ancestors which are phenotypically similar.
 
verb To produce as offspring, bear, procreate, generate, beget or hatch.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Patient discussion about breed

Q. What kind of dogs are considered "low allergy" breeds? My son really wants a dog and I am allergic. Not severely but... Promised to look into getting a low allergy one. Appreciate any info including how to source free/low cost as money is tight.

A. Take in mind that there are also other criteria for choosing a dog. Some of them need special grooming and some aren't really great with kids, but you can check out these breeds and more at www. dogbreedfacts.com. As for myself, I have had several Bichon Frises, and they can be great with kids and other pets, and they are hardy and very, very intelligent!! They arent too big either! Good luck on your hunt!

More discussions about breed
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References in periodicals archive ?
The difference between breeds is a practical way of recognizing the diversity that exists within farm species.
Pairs breed in the harshest winter conditions with the male incubating their egg.
He said New Zealand experts have visited several production projects of sheep, goats, camels, cows, birds, toured a number of breeding farms of special sheep breeds in Qassim, including the Nejdi original breed, and conducted an external examination of these breeds for consideration.
This is the longest running show in the Midwest that has featured rare breeds of farm and working animals.
The term 'improved Kienyeji' generally refers to an indigenous chicken breed obtained from natural cross-breeding between two superior breeds of Kienyeji chickens or a Kienyeji chicken and an exotic breed.
The unit production of the livestock has been lesser than actual potential due to various reasons, including market distortions, nutrition, management, extension services and indiscriminate use of genetic resources for breed improvement.
100 Dandie dinmont One of Britain's oldest terrier breeds, one of the rarest dogs in the world.
Border collie A herding dog and the brightest of all dog breeds, a border collie can understand up to 1,000 words.
The new breeds are a little more difficult to say "shepherd" or "retriever." The Nederlandse Kooikerhondje and the Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen bring the total number of breeds the AKC recognizes to 192, (http://www.akc.org/press-center/press-releases/nederlandse-kooikerhondje-grand-basset-griffon-vendeen-gain-full-american-kennel-club-recognition/) according to a release from the AKC.
I always enjoy reading the articles every issue, especially those that feature a specific breed of gun dog.
Clyde Keeler, a well-respected geneticist, responded to the article, expressing a desire to see a domestic breed, like Tonga, that preserved characteristics of the vanishing cat species found in the wild.
The failure of breeding programs can easily be measured by the falling number of animals within a breed or by outright breed extinction, say Sponenberg, Beranger, and Martin, but evaluating the success of such a program is much more difficult.