circuit

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circuit

 [ser´kut]
the round or course traversed by an electrical current. The circuit is said to be closed when it is continuous, so that the current may pass through it; it is open, broken, or interrupted when it is not continuous and the current cannot pass through it.
reentrant circuit (reentry circuit) the circuit formed by the circulating impulse in reentry.

cir·cuit

(ser'kit),
The path or course of flow of cases or electric or other currents.
[L. circuitus, a going round, fr. circum, around, + eo, pp. itus, to go]

circuit

/cir·cuit/ (ser´kit) [L.] the round or course traversed by an electric current.
reverberating circuit  a neuronal pathway arranged in a circle so that impulses are recycled to cause positive feedback or reverberation.
reentrant circuit  the circuit formed by the circulating impulse in reentry.

circuit

[sur′kit]
Etymology: L, circuitus, going around
a course or pathway, particularly one through which an electric current passes. Current passes through a closed or continuous circuit and stops if the circuit is open, interrupted, or broken. See also volt.

cir·cuit

(sĭr'kŭt)
The path or course of flow of electric or other currents.
[L. circuitus, a going round, fr. circum, around, + eo, pp. itus, to go]

circuit

a round course, or course followed by, for example, electrical current, anesthetic gas, a traveling judge.

Bain coaxial circuit
a variant of the T-piece circuit of delivery of anesthetic gas in which the fresh gas passes up a central tube and the expired gas passes out through the outer sleeve.
breathing circuit
of an anesthetic machine is the pathway by which the volatile anesthetic agent and oxygen are conveyed to the patient and carbon dioxide is removed. The two methods for removal of carbon dioxide are that of venting all expired gases to the exterior, and the method of absorbing the CO2 chemically and rebreathing the expired gas. The two basic circuits are the open circuit in which the patient has access to environmental air as well as the anesthetic-oxygen mixture and exhales into the environment, and the closed system in which all gases are rebreathed. The latter may be a to-and-fro system or a circle system, the latter based on the use of unidirectional valves to ensure that the gases always pass in the correct direction. See also Bain coaxial circuit (above), circle breathing circuit (below), coaxial circuit (below), Lack circuit (below), Magill circuit (below), schimmelbusch mask, T-piece circuit (below).
circle breathing circuit
in an anesthetic machine; the flow of gases is directed by an inclusion in the system of two unidirectional valves, one in an expiratory and one in an inspiratory tube. The rebreathing bag and the canister of sodalime for CO2 absorption are located between the two tubes.
coaxial circuit
a system for the delivery of gaseous anesthetic which has separate conduits for fresh gas and expired air and is essentially the same as the T-piece system except that one conduit is inside the other. An attractive system because the exhaust gases can be ducted to the exterior.
Lack circuit
a coaxial breathing circuit used in anesthesia. Fresh gas flows up the outer sleeve, expired air and gas pass down the inner tube.
Magill circuit
a breathing circuit used in anesthesia. It includes a reservoir bag, wide-bore corrugated tubing and a spring-loaded expiratory valve. It is a semiclosed system in which rebreathing is prevented by having the gas flow rate from the cylinders slightly in excess of the patient's minute respiratory volume.
Mapleson circuit
an anesthetic breathing circuit in which the fresh gas flow is used to remove exhaled carbon dioxide. The Mapleson A circuit is called also the Magill circuit (above), Mapleson D circuit is called also the Bain circuit (above), and the jackson-rees t-piece is the Mapleson F circuit.
non-rebreathing circuit
anesthetic breathing circuits in which exhaled gases are discharged to the environment and do not pass back to the patient. See Magill circuit (above).
parallel circuit
a variation on the Bain and Lack circuits (above) in which there are two tubes running side by side instead of one inside the other.
rebreathing circuit
anesthetic breathing circuits in which the exhaled gas is recirculated to the patient with CO2 removed.
T-piece circuit
a breathing circuit used in anesthesia. Shaped like a T. The exhaled gases are passed into a reservoir tube from which they are pushed by fresh gas from the anesthetic machine as it passes from the stem to the other arm of the T during expiration. There are no valves.
x-ray circuit
a complete path along which an electrical current flows. In its simplest form it includes a source of electrons (power source), a load or resistance, and a conductor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flow and pressure were measured by Ventrak at three locations: between the inspiratory valve of the ventilator and the inspiratory limb of the breathing circuit (inspiratory valve); between the breathing circuit and the ASL500 (Y-piece); and between the expiratory limb and the expiratory valve of the ventilator (expiratory valve).
TV]; 2) the gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was increased by a decrease in lung compliance; 3) in PB840, there was little improvement in actual [V.
T] in injured model, having lower lung compliance than that in the normal, suggests that such gas compression and breathing circuit inflation were enhanced by the decrease in lung compliance, and both also reduced gas volume inflating the test lung.
T] at the expiratory valve, but the PB840 has an additional function of changing flow according to the breathing circuit compliance.
In a previous paper, Silvestri10 showed the dependence of the breathing circuit compliance on the inspiratory flow, while Grazia et al11 showed that actual tidal volume could be reliably estimated if the compliance of the breathing circuit is measured with the same parameters and ventilation technique that is to be utilised in lung protective ventilation.
The Hudson RCI brand has been a leader in respiratory care for more than 65 years, and offers solutions for Oxygen Therapy, Aerosol Therapy, Passive Humidification and Filtration, Active Humidification and Breathing Circuits, Resuscitation Bags, Incentive Spirometers, and Adaptors and Connectors.
Study Reliability And Reporting Limitations I-1 Disclaimers I-2 Data Interpretation & Reporting Level I-2 Quantitative Techniques & Analytics I-3 Product Definitions And Scope Of Study I-3 Anesthesia Breathing Circuits I-3 Endotracheal Tubes I-3 Anesthesia Gas Masks I-3
Product Overview II-7 Key Anesthesia Disposable Products II-7 Anesthesia Gas Masks II-7 Anesthesia Breathing Circuits II-7 Endotracheal Tubes II-7 Other Anesthesia Disposable Products II-7 Disposables Vs Reusable II-8
Table 4: World Recent Past, Current & Future Market Analysis for Disposable Anesthesia Breathing Circuits by Geographic Region - US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), Middle East, and Latin America Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ million for Years 2000 through 2010 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-28
Table 5: World Long-term Projections for Disposable Anesthesia Breathing Circuits by Geographic Region - US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), Middle East, and Latin America Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ million for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-29
Table 6: World 10-Year Perspective for Disposable Anesthesia Breathing Circuits by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Dollar Sales for US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), Middle East, and Latin America Markets for Years 2003, 2008 & 2012 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-30
The Rusch EasyTube rounds out the existing Teleflex Medical family of airway management products, which includes the Sheridan line of endotracheal tubes, anesthesia breathing circuits, face masks, stylets, resuscitation bags, oral airways, and emergency devices.