breastfeed

(redirected from breastfeeds)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to breastfeeds: Breastfeeding

breastfeed

or

breast-feed

(brĕst′fēd′)
v. breast·fed (-fĕd′), breast·feeding, breast·feeds
v.tr.
To feed (a baby) mother's milk from the breast; suckle.
v.intr.
To breastfeed a baby.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2011, Chicago-area mother Katrina Pavlik saw a need and started the website and Facebook group Breastfeed Chicago (https://breastfeedchicago.wordpress.com).
Many moms may have been taught to breastfeed incorrectly: Surprising new research.
The participants discussed support provided by their local multiple birth club and how valuable it was to talk to other mothers who had twins and learn how they managed to breastfeed.
Mothers who were introverted or anxious were more likely to use formula milk or only breastfeed for a short while.
Although they may want to breastfeed, more introverted or anxious mothers may need further support in boosting their confidence and learning about how to solve problems, and they may need encouragement to make sure they access the breastfeeding support services that are available," said.
Even though many mothers start out wanting to breastfeed their infant, many give up too soon; such mothers tend to supplement with formula as early as the second day of the infant's life.
4 Full-time workers were also 19% less likely to breastfeed for more than 6 months when compared to women who were not employed.
All HIV-negative women were encouraged to exclusively breastfeed for 6 completed months, with continued breastfeeding up to 2 years.
Exclusive breastfeeding continues to have a place for the large majority of HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa who cannot replacement feed safely (AFASS) and who wish to breastfeed for cultural reasons, and for the even larger group of HIV-negative women or women of unknown status.
Because many mothers must return to work shortly after the birth of their infant, and because so few of these mothers breastfeed their infants, supports and barriers to breastfeeding were identified through surveys and interviews with WIC breastfeeding promotion staff, local employers, and pregnant and breastfeeding WIC clients who intend to return to work or (if postpartum) have already returned to work.
These factors can result in a woman who was very motivated to breastfeed giving up on breastfeeding before she has even been discharged from the hospital.
Illinois, noting its intent to ensure mothers' right to breastfeed, requires employers provide a workspace that is not a toilet stall for the expressing of breast milk (NCSL, 2015).