breastfeed


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breastfeed

or

breast-feed

(brĕst′fēd′)
v. breast·fed (-fĕd′), breast·feeding, breast·feeds
v.tr.
To feed (a baby) mother's milk from the breast; suckle.
v.intr.
To breastfeed a baby.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the City's health officials attended the World Breastfeeding commemoration to allay the mothers' fears and concerns and to empower them with more knowledge on how to breastfeed and the importance thereof.
"High breastfeeding initiation rates show that most mothers in the United States want to breastfeed and start out doing so," the report states.
Arbab notes that most women can successfully breastfeed with the support and encouragement of hospital staff.
Nutritious complementary foods should then be added while continuing to breastfeed for up to two years or beyond.
PRAMS included data from 11 states and New York City and showed that 22.1% of women did not breastfeed, 27.7% breastfed for less than 10 weeks, and 50.2% breastfed for more than 10 weeks (Ahluwalia et al., 2012).
(3) There are also health advantages for mothers who breastfeed. The most beneficial are decreased postpartum bleeding and faster uterine involution, as well as earlier return to pre-pregnancy weight.
But in order to ensure that more women breastfeed, we need to provide them with support right from the pregnancy stage.
Many women do want to breastfeed but without the necessary support do not achieve this goal.
For example, women who choose to breastfeed typically have higher incomes than those who choose not to breastfeed.
Also, a recent study in Japan showed that although 96% of mothers were willing to breastfeed their infants, only 44% had exclusive breastfeeding for the first 4 weeks after childbirth.