breastbone


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breastbone

(brĕst′bōn′)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

breastbone

The STERNUM.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The pensioner suffered three broken ribs, a fractured breastbone and swollen knee.
It's due to an inflammation in the cartilage where the ribs join the breastbone.
| Lean over the casualty, with your arms straight, pressing down vertically on the breastbone, and press the chest down by 5-6cm (2-21/2in) | Release the pressure without removing your hands from their chest.
Ira Goldsmith, a cardiothoracic surgeon, said: "Removing the tumour also meant removing part of the breastbone and three ribs.
Peter Maggs, from Abergavenny, had three ribs and half his breastbone removed in a day-long operation to take out a tumour the size of a tennis ball.
Surgeons usually cut the middle of the breastbone and a machine circulates blood during the operation.
tunnel Through breastbone Through heart Through tissue's densities
Natalie, 24, complained of regular pains in her chest, around her breastbone. It sometimes radiated to her neck and throat.
honey baby When I think of your head and breastbone I go wild You wear
You should have two of everything except the breastbone. (Of course, you won't have a wishbone since you and your assistant have already made a wish with it!)
Christ and Christian were born conjoined from their breastbone to their abdomen.
The underwire should be capable of encapsulating the breast (and underarm flesh) and tack firmly against the breastbone.