breastfeed

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breastfeed

or

breast-feed

(brĕst′fēd′)
v. breast·fed (-fĕd′), breast·feeding, breast·feeds
v.tr.
To feed (a baby) mother's milk from the breast; suckle.
v.intr.
To breastfeed a baby.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kerry-Ann Methven added: "I'm pretty sure a fed baby is a happy baby, regardless of whether it's breast-fed or bottle-fed.
Differences in morbidity between breast-fed and formula-fed infants.
The CDC reports that the percentage of infants who have ever been breast-fed increased from 60% among babies born in 1993 and 1994 to 77% among infants born in 2005 and 2006.
mothers who ever breast-fed and the number of initiatives aimed at promoting breast-feeding have increased substantially.
One published study found that only 7% of children who were exclusively breast-fed had become infected by 18 months, compared with 14% of those who were only partially breast-fed (AIDS 2005;19:699-708).
Proponents of breast-feeding cite research showing that infants who are breast-fed are less likely to get, or be severely sickened by, diarrhea, ear infections and bacterial meningitis.
A GROUP dedicated to helping new mums is looking for women who have breast-fed their children.
Manila Mayor Lito Atienza, whose city is one of the event's organizers, said 3,738 mothers simultaneously breast-fed their babies for at least one minute, breaking the Guinness World Record.
Breast-fed children, however, when compared to formula-fed children, had an advantage in terms of quality of movements, fluency, and cognitive development tests at 18 and 42 months of age and at 6 years of age, despite a higher PCB exposure from breast milk.
According to breast-feeding advocate at the Women's Health Action Trust in Auckland, Louise James, exclusive breast-feeding means that anything but breast milk given by mouth to a baby--even a teaspoonful of liquid--changes the status from exclusive to fully breast-fed.
Breast-fed infants living in close contact with small-pox vaccinees are at risk for contact vaccinia, even if the vaccinee is not the breast-feeding mother, according to a case report.