breast lobule


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breast lobule

The basic functional unit of the mammary gland, consisting of a tree of several intralobular ducts (also called alveolar ducts), each of which can develop a terminal alveolus composed of milk-secreting epithelial cells. Together, the breast lobules that empty into the same lactiferous duct form a breast lobe.
See also: lobule
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
However, after she completes a full-term pregnancy, 70% of a woman's breast lobules have become mature, cancer-resistant Type 3 lobules.
C, Negative p16 staining in paired, benign breast lobules. D, Positive PELP1 staining in TNBC.
Morphologic features of the lung tumor (A through C); with TTF-1 staining (D); with ER staining at low power (E) and high power (F); and with napsin A staining of the tumor (G) and in residual, benign breast lobules (H) (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnifications 320 [A], x40 [B], and x100 [C]; original magnification x40 [D]; original magnifications x40 [E] and x100 [F]; original magnification x100 [G and H]).
After giving birth, breast lobules switch to a secretory phenotype and ductules are found to be dilated.
Interestingly, CCCTCbinding factor (CTCF) and Dipeptidase 1 (DPEP1), both candidate tumor-suppressor genes, were found to have decreased expression in LCIS versus normal breast lobules. (50) Both genes are found on chromosome 16q.
That is because by the end of a 40-week pregnancy, 85% of a woman's breast lobules have become mature, cancer-resistant lobules known as Type 4 lobules.
Although abundant normal breast lobules were present around the tumors, no histologic lactational change was noted.