conservation

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con·ser·va·tion

(kon'ser-vā'shŭn),
1. Preservation from loss, injury, or decay.
2. In sensorimotor theory, the mental operation by which a person retains the idea of an object after its removal in time or space.
3. Presence of a gene in two different organisms.
4. The retention of structure with a variation in the environment, genetics, or other conditions.
[L. conservatio, a preserving, keeping]

conservation

(kon?ser-va'shon) [L. conservatio, keeping, preserving]
A cognitive principle, first described by Piaget, indicating that a certain quantity remains constant despite the transformation of shape. Children develop conservation ability for number, length, liquid amount, solid amount, space, weight, and volume.

breast conservation

Breast-conserving therapy.

conservation

the preservation, protection and management of an environment which takes into account recreational and aesthetic needs, in addition to preserving as much as possible of the natural fauna and flora and allowing for the harvesting of natural resources and agriculture. This necessitates the sensible planning of what is taken from the environment in terms of the yield of plants, animals and materials, whilst at the same time maintaining as much natural habitat as possible, and thus the largest possible GENE POOL.

con·ser·va·tion

(konsĕr-vāshŭn)
1. Preservation from loss, injury, or decay.
2. Retention of structure with a variation in environment or other conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mastectomy may remain the option of choice in this environment, as its event-free survival compares favorably with that of the combination of breast conservation surgery and radiation therapy.
Some patients do not have the option of breast conservation.
2010; NCCN, 2011) Prognostic factors Precursor to invasive breast cancer in ipsilateral breast (Bland, 2011) Treatment Surgery Breast conservation surgery (BCT): lumpectomy with clear margins (Bland, 2011) Radiation Adjuvant radiation therapy following lumpectomy (Bland, 2011) Surveillance Surveillance every year for lifetime (and every 6 months for 5 years, and then annually post radiation if BCT); annual mammogram (NCCN, 2011) Selective Estrogen Receptor Follow up SERMs optional if Modulators (SERMS) estrogen-receptor positive (NCCN, 2011) Mastectomy Unilateral simple mastectomy or bilateral simple mastectomy (personal choice) (Bland, 2011) Classification of Lesion Lobular Carcinoma in situ Diagnosis Clinical presentation Asymptomatic clinically (Bland, 2011; Choi et al.
The study, published in the journal Cancer, revealed that women who had breast conservation surgery were 13 per cent more likely to survive the illness.
Breast conservation therapy in the United States following the 1990 National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on the treatment of patients with early stage invasive breast cancer.
However, various studies (7,9,10) have showed that there is no significant difference in treat outcome in between mastectomy and breast conservation therapy(BCT) in patients where occult primary can be located after imaging.
4-7,12) We hypothesize that there are two main reasons for the decreased utilization of breast conservation in rural BC patients.
Obtaining negative surgical margins with breast conservation therapy for these tumors is often challenging.
The COMICE trial [2] in the UK attempted to address this in a structured manner and showed no additional benefit in utilising MRI to reduce re-excision rates after breast conservation surgery.
Breast conservation surgery was attempted in more-women in the prophylactic mastectomy group (28%, compared with 16%; P less than .
Explain the procedures of biopsy, breast conservation surgery (lumpectomy, segmental mastectomy), mastectomy, and bilateral mastectomies

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