breast compression


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breast compression

Squeezing the breast between movable grids prior to mammographic or magnetic resonance imaging. Its purpose is to limit movement of the breast and optimize image detail, minimize the dose of radiation received, maximize the quantity of breast tissue in the field of view, and stabilize the breast during biopsy.
See also: compression
References in periodicals archive ?
That's a real consideration, because both imaging methods have their downsides: Mammography entails uncomfortable breast compression, while confinement within the MRI chamber can provoke anxiety.
The CTLM breast imaging system creates 3-D images of the breast via a non-invasive procedure that does not expose the patient to ionising radiation or painful breast compression.
In fact, positioning may be a more important factor in overlooked cancers than breast compression, radiation exposure or image sharpness and contrast, according to a news release from the American Roentgen Ray Society.
The CTLM is a non-invasive, painless examination that does not expose the patient to radiation or require breast compression.
In addition, the CTLM examination is performed without having to employ breast compression, radiation, or contrast injections.
In CT laser mammography, a laser is used to examine the breast using computed tomography techniques, creating a diagnostic image without ionizing radiation or breast compression.
CTLM uses state-of the-art laser technology and proprietary computed algorithms instead of x-rays and breast compression to create three-dimensional views of the blood supply in the breast.
The potential for the CTLM[R] system to substantially increase the detection rate of primary breast cancer in younger women and women with dense breast tissue is truly remarkable, and the fact that this technology neither involves the use of ionizing radiation (X-ray) nor requires any form of breast compression, is likely to substantially increase the speed with which it will be adopted into routine clinical practice," stated Mr.
A system requiring no uncomfortable breast compression while still being able to image patients with dense breasts (increasing diagnostic effectiveness across a broader population) looks like a winner.
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