break point

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break point

point of rupture (of supportive tissues/materials); see law, Hook's
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Each individual drug and device labeling had to be updated whenever breakpoints changed.
In contrast to it, this paper presents one method which only some SFR (special function register) needed to realize the main debugging functions such as single step operation, breakpoint, etc.
For metronidazole, moxifloxacin, and vancomycin categorical agreement between agar dilution and tentative interpretative criteria for disk diffusion was evaluated using CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints for agar dilution.
In accordance with the CLSI recommendations, the results were interpreted using the breakpoints of penicillin and ceftriaxone for meningeal and non-meningeal strains (4).
Each of the breakpoints we describe has a before and after: once you've gone past it, your business will be operating at a higher level of performance--even though some of the breakpoints do not relate directly to the business.
X} breakpoints for simulated translocated fragment lengths of X = 140 bases with both ends unique.
The document provides revised doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem disk diffusion and MIC interpretive criteria with dosage regimens on which the breakpoints are based.
3) Method of graph search [7]: build one graph based on the breakpoints, and then determine the best connections by graph search considering the necessary physical constraints.
As of November 2011 the FDA had not yet confirmed whether the breakpoints on the majority of reference-listed antibiotics labels were up to date.
Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints for penicillin and ceftriaxone varied for meningitis or nonmeningitis infections (Table 2).
Breakpoints generally function as a sliding reduction in the sales charge percentage available for purchases, usually beginning at $25,000 or $50,000 (or the corresponding number of units).
Breakpoints are MICs that define infections as susceptible (treatable), intermediate (possibly treatable with higher doses), and resistant (not treatable) to certain antimicrobials.