brand-name drug


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brand-name drug

A drug marketed under a proprietary, trademark-protected name.
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The generic drug industry opposes the proposed legislation, as it would make it significantly more difficult to challenge patents that protect brand-name drugs from generic competition, a sentiment that voters agree with by a margin of 64% to 36%.
These results highlight the importance of eliminating anticompetitive behavior by brand-name drug companies so that we get more lower-priced generic drugs on the market," Debra Whitman, executive vice president and chief public policy officer at AARP, said in a written statement.
About 41.94% had knowledge that generic medicine differs from their innovator brand names only in nature of excipients and around 43.78% of participants rightly knew that the generic medicine and the innovator brand-name drugs look different because of the difference in the coloring and flavoring agents.
In addition, most physicians refer to drugs by their original brand name even when molecularly identical generic versions are available, which may result in inadvertent dispensing of brand-name drugs, especially in states where automatic generic substitution is prohibited.
Clinical equivalence of generic and brand-name drugs used in cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
First, the proposed generic drug must be chemically equivalent to the approved brand-name drug: it must have the same "active ingredient" or "active ingredients," "route of administration," "dosage form," and "strength" as its brand-name counterpart.
won't sell samples of its brand-name drug Ampyra, which improves multiple sclerosis patients' walking ability.
A generic copy of a brand-name drug must contain the same active ingredient, in the identical quantity, as the branded product--in the same dose formulation and route of administration.
Brand-name drugs are expensive because companies must recoup costs of research and development before patents expire, and pay for marketing and advertising costs.
From 2000 to 2008, 416 brand-name drug products--different drug strengths and dosage forms of the same drug brands--had extraordinary price increases.
In 2005, Ondansetron was the 20th highest-selling brand-name drug in the United States in 2005, with sales totaling $839,256,543.