branch

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branch

 [branch]
a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves, or lymphatics. Called also ramus.
bundle branch a branch of the bundle of His.

branch

(branch), [TA]
An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel. A branch. See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein.
Synonym(s): ramus (1) [TA]

branch

(branch) ramus; a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves, or lymphatics.
bundle branch  a branch of the bundle of His.

branch

(brănch)
n.
Something that resembles a branch of a tree, as in form or function, as:
a. A secondary outgrowth or subdivision of a main axis, such as the tine of a deer's antlers.
b. Anatomy An offshoot or a division of the main portion of a structure, especially that of a nerve, blood vessel, or lymphatic vessel; a ramus.
v. branched, branching, branches
v.intr.
To put forth a branch or branches; spread by dividing.

branch′less adj.
branch′y adj.

branch

(in anatomy) an offshoot arising from the main trunk of a nerve or blood vessel.

branch

A division of a thing into smaller subunits, which remain connected to the original whole in a tree-like, arborescing fashion. Branching is typical of anatomic structures that divide the further they are from their origin—e.g., arterioles, venules, bronchioles and nerves.

branch

(branch)
An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel.
See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein
Synonym(s): ramus (1) .
[Fr. branche, related to L. brachium, arm]

branch

primary division of nerve/blood vessel (see ramus)

branch

(branch)
[TA] An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel.
See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein
[Fr. branche, related to L. brachium, arm]

branch

1. ramus; a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves or lymphatics.
2. the bearing surface of the horseshoe that supports the wall of the hoof. There is a lateral and a medial branch.

bundle branch
a branch of the bundle of His.
communicating gray branch
postganglionic nerve fibers coursing between the sympathetic ganglia and the spinal nerves; destined for skin glands, blood vessels and the like; join spinal and cranial nerves.
communicating white branch
preganglionic fibers of the sympathetic system originate in the lateral columns of the spinal cord and pass to the spinal nerves and then, via the communicating white fibers, to the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the end, Branching Out folded because it relied too heavily for too long on a small group of volunteers--especially long-time editor Sharon Batt, who is uniformly described by Branching Out participants as the driving force behind the magazine after Susan McMaster left in 1975--and these women eventually burned out or went on to other (often paid) work that did not afford them the time required to produce a magazine like Branching Out.
These cover images seem intended to convey the variety of women who read Branching Out and to attest to the magazine's extraordinary longevity compared with the short lives of so many Canadian feminist periodicals.
Following the table of contents is a letter from "The Branching Out staff," addressed to readers and accompanied by a five-panel comic entitled "The Last Word on Branching Out," which cites the reasons for folding the magazine (see figure 5).
These comments parody some of the criticism directed at Branching Out over the years and allude to the challenges of trying to produce a feminist magazine with newsstand appeal.