branching


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

branch·ing

(branch'ing),
Dividing into parts; sending out offshoots; bifurcating.
Synonym(s): ramose, ramous
[Fr. branche, related to L. branchium, arm]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

branching

adjective Separating or dividing into branches.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

branch·ing

(branch'ing)
Dividing into parts; sending out offshoots; bifurcating.
[Fr. branche, related to L. branchium, arm]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Arizona, Maine, Colorado, Alaska and Mississippi are the top five with an average of 90% of credit union members in these states having access to shared branching in Q2 2015.
* Maine (88%), Alaska (67%), Arizona (61%), Colorado (59%) and Washington (59%) take the lead in terms of the percentage of credit unions enrolled in shared branching.
In the TAM, the IRS took the unusual step of addressing additional issues that were rendered moot by the conclusion that the branching rights did not have an FMV basis under Sec.
Even assuming that the branching rights received an FMV basis under Sec.
Both chemists say their inspiration came largely from branching systems in nature, such as trees, ferns and circulatory systems.
Ever since Newkome read a paper on the branching patterns of trees growing in South American forests, he says, he has pursued two questions: "Can I make molecular trees?" and "How big can I make them?"
Nineteen percent of the respondents were in the Gen Y age range, yet this age group comprised 25% of the total using shared branching at least once per month.
Shared branching helps if a branch must be shuttered in a particular area because of a difficult business decision, for instance.
She also acknowledged that, in some cases, branches closing has also meant shared branching outlets closing as well.
Moreover, if identity of treatment is a prerequisite for national treatment, the question arises as to whether section 231 may be viewed as denying national treatment because it prohibits foreign banks from branching in the United States from their head offices when U.S.