branchial clefts


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bran·chi·al clefts

a bilateral series of slitlike openings into the pharynx through which water is drawn by aquatic animals; in the walls of the clefts are the vascular gill filaments that take up oxygen from the water passing through the clefts; sometimes wrongly applied to the pharyngeal grooves of mammalian embryos, which are imperforate, rudimentary homologues of complete gill clefts.
Synonym(s): gill clefts

branchial clefts

the apertures in the walls of the PHARYNX of fish or young amphibia (four-seven pairs) which allow water entering by the mouth to pass out over the gills.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second branchial cleft cyst: variability of sonographic appearances in adult cases.
First branchial cleft cysts appear as simple or complicated unilocular cystic lesions within, superficial, or deep to the parotid gland on CT and MRI (Figure 7).
Based on topography and the histopathologic and immunohistochemical results, the masses were determined to be a second branchial cleft cyst for the first case and a second branchial pouch cyst for the second case.
Current management of congenital branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulae.
(a) Extraglandular mass- First branchial cleft cyst: First branchial cleft cyst may appear as truly cystic with anechoic content, homogeneous hyperechoic with a pseudo solid appearance or heterogeneous hypoechoic with internal debris in infected cysts.
Surgery for thyroglossal duct and branchial cleft anomalies.
An effective surgical technique for the excision of first branchial cleft fistula: make-inside-exposed method by tract incision.
(2) According to the most widely accepted theory regarding branchial remnants, branchial cleft anomalies are the result of a persistent branchial apparatus secondary to either (1) an incomplete closure of either clefts or pouches or (2) the failure of the second and fourth arches to obliterate the cervical sinus of His.
Histopathologic examination was consistent with a branchial cleft cyst.
This combination of findings often results in misdiagnosis as branchial cleft cysts or as carcinoma arising in a branchial cleft cyst.
Branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulas are the most common congenital lateral neck lesions in children.