practice

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practice

 [prak´tis]
the exercise of a profession.
collaborative practice communication, sharing, and problem solving between the physician and nurse as peers; this pattern of practice also implies a shared responsibility and accountability for patient care.
differentiated practice the use of nursing staff in an acute care setting according to their expertise and qualifications.
evidence-based practice provision of health care that incorporates the most current and valid research results.
family practice the medical specialty of a family physician, concerned with the planning and provision of comprehensive primary health care, regardless of age or sex, on a continuing basis. Called also family medicine.
general practice old term for comprehensive medical care regardless of age of the patient or presence of a condition that may require the services of a specialist; this term has now largely been replaced by the term family practice.
nursing practice see nursing practice.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

prac·tice

(prak'tis),
The exercise of the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

practice

(prăk′tĭs)
v.
To engage in the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
n.
1. The exercise of the profession of medicine.
2. The business of a practicing physician or group of physicians, including facilities and customary patients.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

practice

Medspeak-US
The place where a physician practises medicine in a privately managed setting. (Termed “surgery” in the UK.)

Sports medicine (US)
verb To train at a particular activity; see Spring practice.
 
Vox populi
noun A habit; the manner of performing something.

verb (practise, BrE) To perform the art and science of medicine.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

practice

Medtalk noun Surgery–British The place where a physician practices medicine in a privately managed setting. See Better practice, Family practice, General practice, Group practice, Independent practice, Integrated group practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice Sports medicine To train at a particular activity. See Spring practice Vox populi.
A habit, manner of performing something. See Good laboratory practice, Good manufacturing practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice, Spring practice verb To perform the art and science of medicine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
1. Direct professional involvement in health care services.
2. Rehearsal of a task or skill with the goal of achieving proficiency.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
Exercise of the profession of dentistry, medicine, or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about practice

Q. does anyone practice bikram-yoga and know misuse of knee that can result from it? I just started this type of youga 2 weeks ago but do it 3-4 times a week and now I have a pain in the knee- like an inflamation from the pressure or something... Is anyone into bikram and know how can I prevent that from happening???

A. hi...This is Prashantmurti...I m a Yoga Teacher by profession...
In a straight way I will recommannd you to do a traditional Yoga...not like Vikram yoga or hot yoga...even Ramdev's Yoga has a possibility of high side effects...
If possible fing a yoga teacher or instution of Satyananda Yoga (bihar Yoga)in ur location, which is very practical,traditional, simple and effective...better not to do vikram yoga ..give some rest to ur knees and after that go thru Satyananda Yoga.
(prashantmurti@yahoo.com)
Happy New Year

More discussions about practice
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References in periodicals archive ?
(77) The discussion here focuses on executive branch practice beginning in the early twentieth century.
(168) Jack Balkin's version of "new originalism" seems particularly conducive to reliance on political branch practice. See Jack M.
I consider here what the political debates might tell us about constitutional interpretation in the political branches and then raise questions about whether, or the extent to which, the judiciary should be influenced by these political branch practices.
(170) Even if those interpretive approaches are appropriate for the political branches (a matter that, in my view, warrants further scholarly study), it may make sense for a judge to think twice before using political branch practices based on such methods as establishing the "authoritative" meaning of Article III.
Outside of such contexts, however, there are good reasons for the judiciary to independently interpret Article III, giving little, if any, weight to political branch practices. In fact, such independent interpretation may make sense precisely because of the different institutional makeup and capacities of the courts.
In some respects they are similar to executive branch practice, which is widely viewed as an important tool in separation of powers contexts, including foreign affairs and war powers.
Many international norms applicable to the United States constitute some form of executive branch practice, so to that extent the use of international law as an interpretive tool should be unproblematic.
Relying on executive branch practice in constitutional interpretation must mean more than simply deferring to the president's current litigating position.