brain-gut axis

brain-gut axis

A functional neurogastrointestinal unit which links the endocrine and nervous systems through hormonal peptides—e.g., bombesin, CCK, enkephalin, gastrin, neurotensin, somatostatin, substance P, VIP and others—that also serve as neurotransmitters.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

brain-gut ax·is

(brān-gŭt ak'sis)
The continuous feedback loop between sensory neurons in the gastrointestinal tract and motor response generated in the central nervous system. Hypersensitivity in the brain-gut axis contributes to functional GI disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As research continues to uncover the interconnectedness of the immune system, the microbiome, and the brain-gut axis it underscores that supporting everyday health is just as important as the timely use of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals.
When we walk into our partner's or boss's office to discuss the latest sales figures, take one look at their gloomy expression and feel a tightening in our intestines, that's evidence of the brain-gut axis in action.
Creating a healthy gut microbiota is being investigated as a treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.
The Role of the Endocannabinoid System in the Brain-Gut Axis. Gastroenterology.
Vagal pathways for microbiome- brain-gut axis communication.
KEY WORDS: Brain-gut axis, Central sensitization, Irritable bowel syndrome, Migraine.
A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity, and that positively influence so called brain-gut axis,' states a study in the Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 2015 co-authored by Dr.
The IBS is a stress-related brain-gut axis disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration in intestinal habit [43].
Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are particularly common, probably due to the cross talk between the brain and the gut through the brain-gut axis [3].
The etiology of IBS, until now, is incompletely understood, but is thought to be multifactorial, including abnormal regulation of the brain-gut axis involving both centrall and peripheral mechanisms10.
A lot of research is underway to explore the brain-gut axis. Early outcomes point to possible changes in the way a number of diseases are treated in the future.