brain-dead


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brain-dead

(brān′dĕd′)
adj.
1. Having irreversible brain damage with accompanying loss of brain function.
2. Informal Having little intelligence or interest; stupid or indifferent: "Office, pub, telly, bed, week after week. Ten years of that, and they're brain-dead" (Jane Stevenson).

brain-dead

loss of brainstem reflexes
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Jamal said that it was very difficult to convince relatives of brain-dead people to donate organs.
That proposal would strengthen the requirement that pregnant patients be kept on life-sustaining support, including in cases in which the patient is brain-dead.
According to this view, vitality and its inseparable other, heat, do not exist in a brain-dead individual who has irreversibly lost the integration of organic processes.
The current Organ Transplant Law limits brain-dead donors to those aged over 15, a restriction which forbids surgery such as heart transplants for children.
Her transplant operation was the 17th from brain-dead donors since the procedure was legalized in 1997, in accordance with the country's Organ Transplant Law.
George III is now recovering and his dad said: "I knew if I had three hours I'd know whether George was brain-dead.
That proposal, House Bill 1901, would strengthen the requirement that pregnant patients be kept on life-sustaining support, including in cases in which the patient is brain-dead.
The two transplants were conducted after securing the approval of the brain-dead patient's family.
The Court of Appeals is looking into whether the defendant had prematurely pronounced the victim brain-dead, thereby causing her to stop receiving treatment.
He warned that a lot of kids would become fairly brain-dead if they become so dependent on the internet, because they will not be able to do things the old-fashioned way.
Although the action to remove the artificial respirator and other means of life support was in line with the family's request, it could spark a new ethical debate on pros and cons of removing life support for a brain-dead patient.
To allay fears that surgeons might try to retrieve the organs of dying patients prematurely, the board of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) approved standards last week to protect the growing number of donors who have no hope of recovery but who are not officially brain-dead.