brain wave


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brain wave

colloquialism for electroencephalogram.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

brain wave

n.
A rhythmic fluctuation of electric potential between parts of the brain, as seen on an electroencephalogram.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

brain wave

(brān wāv)
Colloquialism for electroencephalogram.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

brain wave

One of many periodic electric potentials generated in the brain and detectable by the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM. Some of the brain waves are dominant and of recognizable frequency.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Using Brain Wave Measures to Assess Advertising Effects." Cambridge, MA: Marketing Science Institute, Report No.
"We don't know all the answers yet, but the alteration in brain waves could lead to things like a lack of concentration, memory loss, inability to learn and aggressive behaviour."
The researchers tested the same children at 30, 36, and 42 months of age to further explore the association between the P3 brain wave and aggression.
What's more, the researchers found, these different types of behavior are accompanied by different patterns of brain waves.
People's brain waves caused a gene to turn on in mice, researchers report November 11 in Nature Communications.
As pairs of guitarists played the same jazz melody in time with each other, their brain waves became more synchronised, scientists found.
Tucker said future research will explore whether a standard set of adjustments can be used to refine brain wave data in some people.
Brain fingerprinting, however, monitors brain waves, electrical signals created by nerve cells, which scientists believe are involuntary, or beyond conscious control.
Two thirds of infants show a characteristic brain wave pattern for pain and a similar proportion display typical pain behaviour and a moderate pain score.
Whether by coincidence or not, the frequency of 7.83 also happens to be a very powerful frequency used with brain entrainment, as it is associated with low levels of alpha and the upper range of the theta brain wave state.'
In the study, computer scientist Stefan Haufe of the Berlin Institute of Technology and his colleagues measured brain wave changes while participants drove in a car simulator.