cognitive science

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cognitive science

n.
The interdisciplinary study of the mind, intelligence, and learning, including research in psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and artificial intelligence.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cognitive science

The study of memory, information processing, algorithm use, hypothesis formation, and problem solving in human and computer systems.
See also: science
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
We hope to see more labs focusing on the interdisciplinary study of brain science,' Wang added.
IN THE RELATIVELY NEAR future, brain science may produce all sorts of technological breakthroughs: brain scans that determine whether someone is telling the truth; tests that uncover secret urges or latent tendencies, such as a penchant for violence; pills and other treatments to erase traumatic memories or reduce the misery they cause, as well as treatments to strengthen one's memory skills; and procedures to treat and even cure blindness, quadriplegia, epilepsy, and Parkinson's disease.
The Brain Science Institute was the first of its research centers to make English its official operation language in an effort to become more international.
``The lecture series is a deep dive into brain science and neuroscience in general,''he said.``We start by studying the brain structure, using a 3D computer- generated model of the brain.
Ironically, then, the brain is most prepared to begin learning at just the point when popular brain science says it is too late for learning to take place.
He merely opposes using brain science to justify such activities and social programs, because that is premature.
From how the brain is hotwired for belief creation to inherent physical biases and how it prefers favorable, rewarding belief systems, this provides an excellent survey of brain science and its link to belief, and is a pick for any science reader.
Prof Jen-Chuen Hsieh, from the Institute of Brain Science, Taipei, said: "Abnormal GM changes were present in PDM patients even in the absence of pain."
Dr Vikki Burns, from the university's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, fought off competition from across the UK to land the top prize in the first ever National Brain Science Writing Prize.
This book is about an important discovery in brain science as well as the nature of genius and creativity.
Based on brain science discoveries in visual and syntactic processing, Live Ink helps readers' eyes float down the screen, absorbing sentences that have been computer-formatted to improve the brain's ability to extract meaning and build comprehension.