braincase

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Related to brain case: neurocranium

neu·ro·cra·ni·um

(nū'rō-krā'nē-ŭm), [TA]
Those bones of the cranium enclosing the brain, as distinguished from the bones of the face.
[neuro- + G. kranion, skull]

braincase

also

brain case

(brān′kās′)
n.
The part of the skull that encloses the brain. Also called brainpan.

neu·ro·cra·ni·um

(nūr'ō-krā'nē-ŭm) [TA]
Those bones of the cranium enclosing the brain, as distinguished from the bones of the face.
Synonym(s): brain box, braincase.
[neuro- + G. kranion, skull]
References in periodicals archive ?
There are three basic ways in which the jaw is suspended from the brain case.
Ferenbach as saying that modern man probably appeared at different times and places because of a dominant mutation of the brain including the remodelling of the brain case.
Yet adult mandrills, which possess fewer genetic similarities to baboons than mangabeys do, have an extended muzzle and a relatively large brain case that gives them a baboonlike look.
She notes, for instance, that the angle and size of the specimen's brain case and its moderate brow ridge fall squarely between measurements of the same traits in the two established groups.
Some researchers cite anatomical links -- often based on measurements of the brain case and teeth -- between Tasmanian and Australian aborigines, suggesting the former group migrated from Australia across an ancient land bridge to their island home, about 200 miles to the south.
Furthermore, the fixation of meaning as the corpus-callosum-supported attentional oscillation between left hemisphere's verbal tokens and right hemisphere's modal percepts is not only unsubstantiated but raises obvious questions in the context of split brain cases.
These images are loaded onto an open site maintained by UC Davis for other researchers (all brain cases are identified by a special case number to protect confidentiality of the donor).
Ancient American skulls feature long, narrow brain cases and small, short faces, unlike those of modern Native Americans.
erectus fossils, including skulls with surprisingly small brain cases suggestive of an early form of the species.
The nearly 2-million-year-old Malapa fossils share some key traits with the Homo genus, including round brain cases and long, inward-curving lower backs.