brachytherapy


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brachytherapy

 [brak″e-ther´ah-pe]
internal radiation therapy using a radioactive source placed either within the body or a cavity, on the body surface, or a short distance from the surface.

brach·y·ther·a·py

(brak'ē-thār'ă-pē),
Radiotherapy in which the source of irradiation is placed close to the surface of the body or within a body cavity; for example, application of radium to the cervix.

brachytherapy

(brăk′ē-thĕr′ə-pē)
n. pl. brachythera·pies
Radiotherapy in which the source of radiation is placed close to the surface of the body or within a body cavity.
Radiation therapy in which radioactive materials­—iridium-192, radium-226, and other radioisotopes—sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters are placed in direct contact with certain carcinomas to deliver locally intense ionising radiation—e.g., as needed in invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix

brachytherapy

Implant radiation, internal radiation, intracavitary therapy, interstitial radiation therapy Radiation oncology RT in which radioactive materials–iridium-192, radium-226, and other radioisotopes, sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters are placed in direct contact with certain carcinomas to deliver locally intense ionizing radiation–eg, as needed in invasive CA of the uterine cervix. See Intravascular brachytherapy.

brach·y·ther·a·py

(brak'ē-thār'ă-pē)
Radiotherapy in which the source of irradiation is placed close to the surface of the body or implanted in the tissues to be treated (e.g., application of radium to the cervix). Treatment targets specific tissues without harm to the surrounding normal tissue.

brachytherapy

A form of RADIOTHERAPY in which sealed sources of radioactive material are inserted for various periods into body cavities or directly into tumours, so as to lie as close as possible to the area to be radiated.

Brachytherapy

A type of radiation treatment for cancer in which the source of the radiation is applied directly to the surface of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Studies have reached varying conclusions about the impact of race on brachytherapy utilization, with several smaller studies suggesting that minority women may be less likely to receive brachytherapy services compared to white women.
1 month after completion of intraluminal brachytherapy, a number of patients with improvement of dysphagia were 34 (79%) and 9 (21%) patients showed no improvement of dysphagia.
61.1% of patients were treated with combination of EBRT and Brachytherapy and rest of the patients (39.9%) were treated with only brachytherapy.
Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy technique in which a small radioactive implant is inserted into the patient's tissue, directly into the tumour or close to it.
All patients who received LDR brachytherapy as a component of treatment, developed prostate specific antigen (PSA) recurrence, and subsequently underwent mpMRI and biopsy or surgical resection at our institution between January 2011 and March 2016 were analyzed.
At each short-term follow-up ([less than or equal to] 6 weeks) after completing his HDR brachytherapy, he reported a rewarding response with improvement of disease-related erythema, pain, and swelling in all treated areas, with near resolution of treatment related hyperpigmentation (Figures 1(c), 1(d), and 1(f)).
Radiotherapy using brachytherapy technique is a well-established option as regards to acceptability and outcome of treatment in terms of local control, cosmesis and hand function.
The dosimetric quality of our brachytherapy plans was evaluated according to the conformation number (CN), external volume index (EI), and homogeneity index (HI).
The treatment can be delivered in one of two ways: external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy, in which tiny radioactive seeds are implanted in the prostate.
UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center in Sacramento, Ca., added BodyTom, the world's first portable, full-body, 32- slice CT scanner to its brachytherapy suite.