brachypterous


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Related to brachypterous: macropterous, brachiopod

brachypterous

(bră-kĭp′tər-əs)
adj.
Having short or rudimentary wings, as certain insects.

bra·chyp′ter·ism (-tə-rĭz′əm) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
We collected 410 individuals (77 macropterous and 333 brachypterous, see details in Table 1) of Metrioptera roeselii from which we selected equal numbers (42-42) of macropterous and brachypterous individuals, with a nearly equal proportion of males (40) and females (44).
clarus Mockford, eight species have forewing M dichotomously branched, resulting in four M veins, four species have M with five branches, and one species is brachypterous, with forewing venation not well defined; in all, V2+3 has a distinct anterior heel, and V1 is missing, although a few undescribed South American species have a short V1.
A brief revision of brachypterous Phaneropterinae of the tropical Andes (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Odonturini).
Poisson (1949) reported that approximately 90 % of the individuals from Democratic Republic of the Congo were brachypterous and 10 % macropterous.
A limited number of studies involving planthoppers and other wing-dimorphic insects have demonstrated a fitness advantage in brachypterous males.
The neotropical genus Disceratus Scudder 1869 comprises five species of yellowish or reddish brown, short-legged and brachypterous katydids that are distinguished by two knobs or spiniform processes on the clypeus, and elongated mandibles in males.
STRUCTURE: Body and hemelytra much more rounded than males; brachypterous with the cuneus reduced or obsolete, and membrane greatly reduced.
Pissonotus quadripustulatus is multivoltine with overlapping generations and is normally 100% brachypterous (Stiling 1994).
2004) observed that replacement by brachypterous nymphs occurred in two 3-yr-old colonies that naturally lost a primary reproductive.
Tegmina and wings only slightly brachypterous, the apices of the tegmina rounded, as long as, or just exceeding the posterior margin of, the 10th abdominal tergite.
Austen (1936) described a strange, hairy and brachypterous fly from two male specimens collected at Ukasi (as Ukazzi) in 1933 by Major Harry Barron Sharpe, then District Commissioner of the large Garissa District of eastern Kenya.