neuralgic amyotrophy

(redirected from brachial neuritis)

neu·ral·gic a·my·ot·ro·phy

a neurologic disorder, of unknown cause, characterized by the sudden onset of severe pain, usually about the shoulder and often beginning at night, soon followed by weakness and wasting of various forequarter muscles, particularly shoulder girdle muscles; both sporadic and familial in occurrence with the former much more common; often preceded by some antecedent event, such as an upper respiratory infection, hospitalization, vaccination, or nonspecific trauma; usually attributed to a brachial plexus lesion, because the nerve fibers involved are most often derived from the upper trunk.

shoulder girdle syndrome

A condition evoked by upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system.
 
Aetiology
Contusions, fractures, neurovascular injuries.
 
Clinical findings
Acute searing pain, marked muscle-weakness, vasomotor lability, oedema, osteoporosis and, with time, wasting of the shoulder girdle and upper arm.
 
DiffDx
• Acute phase—Frozen shoulder, calcific tendonitis or arthritis.
• Chronic phase—Rotator cuff tears, nerve root compression.

neu·ral·gic a·my·ot·ro·phy

(nūr-al'jik ā'mī-ot'rŏ-fē)
A neurologic disorder of unknown cause, characterized by the sudden onset of severe pain, usually about the shoulder and often beginning at night, soon followed by weakness and wasting of various forequarter muscles, particularly shoulder girdle muscles; both sporadic and familial in occurrence with the former much more common; often preceded by some antecedent event, such as an upper respiratory infection, hospitalization, vaccination, or nonspecific trauma; usually attributed to a brachial plexus lesion, because the nerve fibers involved are most often derived from the upper trunk, but actually multiple proximal mononeuropathies.
Synonym(s): shoulder-girdle syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of its late onset and the predominance of pain compared to motor loss, a brachial neuritis such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome, sometimes reported following surgery, was ruled out.
(1) Although rare, acute brachial neuritis, infection, rotator cuff injuries, and contusions of the humeral head have also been reported.
Brachial neuritis is a rare association with dengue fever, reported first time in literature by Verma recently20.
KEY WORDS: chiropractic, neuralgic amoytraophy Parsonage-Turner syndrome, brachial neuritis
Historically, AIN neuropraxia has been shown to arise spontaneously, as a result of trauma, or as a component of brachial neuritis [1].
Brachial neuritis caused by Varicella-Zoster diagnosed by changes in brachial plexus on MRI.
Over the course of the next five years, the symptoms became more intense, and Herb's "diagnoses" from various doctors ranged from thyroid problems and brachial neuritis to a manifestation of psychological issues.
The next most frequent manifestation was PTS, also called brachial neuritis or neuralgic amyotrophy, which was found in 4 patients.
Neuralgic amyotrophy (paralytic brachial neuritis) with special reference to prognosis.
We suspect that the tetanus portion of the vaccination produced TM in our patient because vaccination with tetanus toxoid has been mainly associated with neurological side effects such as recurrent episodes of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), brachial neuritis, peripheral neuropathy, encephalomyeloneuropathy and TM (17-22).
The researchers examined seven categories of adverse events: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS); brachial neuritis; paralytic syndromes; medically attended inflammatory or allergic events; cranial nerve disorders (including Bell's palsy); "anaphylaxis and generalized reaction"; and meningitis, encephalitis, and encephalopathy.