brachial artery


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brach·i·al ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, is a continuation of the axillary beginning at the inferior border of the teres major muscle; branches, deep brachial, superior ulnar collateral, inferior ulnar collateral, muscular, and nutrient; terminates in the cubital fossa (elbow level) by bifurcating into radial and ulnar arteries.

brachial artery

The major artery located medially in the upper arm, midway between the elbow and shoulder.

Origin
Axial artery at the inferior margin of the teres major muscle.

Termination
Splits into the radial and ulnar arteries at the cubital fossa.

Palpation
At the cubital fossa, medial to the biceps tendon.

brach·i·al ar·te·ry

(brā'kē-ăl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, a continuation of the axillary artery beginning at the inferior border of the teres major muscle; branches, deep brachial, superior ulnar collateral, inferior ulnar collateral, muscular, and nutrient; terminates in the cubital fossa by bifurcating into radial and ulnar arteries.
Synonym(s): arteria brachialis [TA] .
Enlarge picture
BRACHIAL ARTERY

brachial artery

The main artery of the arm. The brachial artery is a continuation of the axillary artery and it runs on the inside (medial side) of the arm; it terminates by splitting into the radial and ulnar arteries. Its main branches include the deep brachial (profunda brachii) artery and the superior and inferior ulnar collateral arteries.
See: illustration
See also: artery

brachial artery

The main artery supplying the arm with blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of our study coincide with the results of the study which evaluated the effects of yogic intervention on brachial artery reactivity in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.
The mistake committed by the cardiologist was to rely on the measurement of the arterial blood pressure of right brachial artery (unilaterally) while omitting and failing to compare the pressure bilaterally and with the distal radial pulse, representing a basic and important message to all physicians, medical practitioners, and the paramedical staff.
Controversies also exist in treatment of complications accompanying fractures, such as in cases of the so-called "pink, pulseless hand," while some authors consider that conservative treatment and systematic control are fully sufficient because the vascular spasms can persist for 24-48 hours, making an early vascular intervention in otherwise symptomless patients not necessary [7,11,14, 28, 30, 33] and even that early intervention by a vascular surgeon to repair the brachial artery is associated with a high rate of reocclusion and residual brachial artery stenosis [7, 28, 34].
(33) reported an increase in brachial artery FMD immediately after a single sub-maximal treadmill exercise bout, with the values returning to near baseline after 1 h.
(6), described a superficial brachioulnoradial artery as a superficial brachial artery branching at the elbow into radial and ulnar arteries and coexisting with a typical brachial artery that continues as the common interosseous trunk.
Demi, "A system for real-time measurement of the brachial artery diameter in B-mode ultrasound images," IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, vol.
After a 15-min rest period, high-resolution brachial artery ultrasound was performed to measure BAD with a 10-MHz linear-array transducer and a Terason 2000 ultrasound (Teratech Corporation, Burlington, MA, USA) with electrocardiogram-gated image acquisition at end diastole.
The coracobrachialis muscle in both upper limbs (right & left) was exposed after dissection according to the instructions by Cunningham's manual of practical anatomy to observe any variation in insertion or any abnormal slip from the muscle & its relation with median nerve & brachial artery.
In which part of the body is the brachial artery? 7.
In the presented case, the mother's history of recurrent abortus, hematochezia during the first hours of life, and development of an acute thrombus in the region of the brachial artery suggested that the patient had an underlying prothrombotic disease.
Ultrasound evaluation of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (a measure of blood vessel function) was conducted, and plasma levels of cotinine, vitamin E, malondialdehyde, and pro-inflammatory mediators were measured before and after the treatment period.