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brace

 [brās]
1. an orthopedic appliance or apparatus applied to the body, particularly the trunk and lower limbs, to support the weight of the body, to correct or prevent deformities, or to control involuntary movements. See also orthosis.
2. (in the plural) orthodontic appliance.
Milwaukee brace a brace consisting of a leather girdle and neck ring connected by metal struts; used to brace the spine in the treatment of scoliosis.
Milwaukee brace. From Bolander, 1994.
neck brace cervical orthosis.

brace

(brās),
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position a part of the body and can allow motion at adjacent joints, in contrast to a splint, which prevents motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]

brace

(brās) an orthopedic appliance or apparatus (an orthosis) used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position; also, usually in the plural, an orthodontic appliance for correction of malaligned teeth.

brace

(brās)
n.
1. An orthopedic appliance used to support, align, or hold a bodily part in the correct position.
2. often braces A dental appliance constructed of bands and wires that is fixed to the teeth to correct irregular alignment.
3. An extremely stiff, erect posture.
4. A cause or source of renewed physical or spiritual vigor.
v. braced, bracing, braces
v.tr.
To furnish with a brace.

brace

Etymology: OFr, bracier, to embrace
an orthotic device, sometimes jointed, used to support and hold any part of the body in the correct position to allow function and healing, such as a leg brace that permits walking and standing. Compare splint.

brace

Any external device used to shore mechanically weakened or compromised musculoskeletal groups.

brace

Orthopedics A device that shores biomechanically weakened body parts. See Milwaukee brace.

brace

(brās)
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position any movable part of the body and that allows motion of the part, in contrast to a splint, which prevents motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]

brace

1. An ORTHODONTIC appliance used to correct malposition of the teeth by exerting pressure in the desired direction. Sustained pressure on a tooth causes bone absorption on the side opposite that on which pressure is applied and bone growth on the same side.
2. An externally worn leg support needed when a leg is unstable from muscle weakness or joint disease, or a spinal support used to correct deformity such as SCOLIOSIS.

brace

a support to maintain a part of the body in its correct position.

brace

(brās)
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position any movable part of the body and that allows motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]

brace,

n an orthotic device to support and hold part of the body in the correct position to allow function, such as a leg brace that permits walking and standing. Sometimes used to describe orthodontic appliances.

brace

1. an orthopedic appliance or apparatus (orthosis), usually made of metal or leather, applied to the body, particularly the trunk and lower extremities. Has limitations in animals as compared to humans. Used mainly for support for the lower limbs of horses.
2. the stance from which a polo shot is played.
3. a pair of animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mishra et al (1989) evaluated four designs of knee braces at 30 [+ or -] 5[degrees] of knee flexion and reported that the anterior tibial displacement decreased in braced conditions.
In other words, based on the proposed design procedure, 2 by 4 webs longer than 14 feet cannot be braced by a 2 by 4 T-brace due to the NDS slenderness limitation.
W] was braced in a specific manner by another 2 by 4 brace having length [L.
It should be noted that the experimental ratios from the ultimate load tests are based on sample sizes of 3 and 10 for the unbraced and braced members, respectively (Leichti et al.
The specimens consisted of nominal 2 by 4 SPF simulated truss webs braced by a 2 by 4 SPF T-brace using 16d box nails (0.
We use this T-braced web stiffness to define a fictitious enhanced E for the web, which can then be used to calculate the axial design load capacity of the braced web.
Waltz tested Select Structural and Standard Douglas Fir-Larch (DFL) specimens axially loaded and braced by his computer-controlled testing apparatus to determine the required brace force.
For permanent bracing design purposes, a simple "hand calculation" method was desired to approximate the brace force required to stabilize numerous compression webs braced by one or two CLBs or chords braced by CLBs at multiple locations.
The ends of the braced webs or chords were pin connected; therefore, pin or roller reactions were used to support the member ends;
Truss webs were braced with one or two CLBs at the center or third points of the length, respectively.
This iterative procedure was necessary to accommodate a nonlinear spring (nail connection) in the SAP analysis of the braced system.