brace


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to brace: brace oneself

brace

 [brās]
1. an orthopedic appliance or apparatus applied to the body, particularly the trunk and lower limbs, to support the weight of the body, to correct or prevent deformities, or to control involuntary movements. See also orthosis.
2. (in the plural) orthodontic appliance.
Milwaukee brace a brace consisting of a leather girdle and neck ring connected by metal struts; used to brace the spine in the treatment of scoliosis.
Milwaukee brace. From Bolander, 1994.
neck brace cervical orthosis.

brace

(brās),
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position a part of the body and can allow motion at adjacent joints, in contrast to a splint, which prevents motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]

brace

(brās)
n.
1. An orthopedic appliance used to support, align, or hold a bodily part in the correct position.
2. often braces A dental appliance constructed of bands and wires that is fixed to the teeth to correct irregular alignment.
3. An extremely stiff, erect posture.
4. A cause or source of renewed physical or spiritual vigor.
v. braced, bracing, braces
v.tr.
To furnish with a brace.

brace

Any external device used to shore mechanically weakened or compromised musculoskeletal groups.

brace

Orthopedics A device that shores biomechanically weakened body parts. See Milwaukee brace.

brace

(brās)
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position any movable part of the body and that allows motion of the part, in contrast to a splint, which prevents motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]

brace

1. An ORTHODONTIC appliance used to correct malposition of the teeth by exerting pressure in the desired direction. Sustained pressure on a tooth causes bone absorption on the side opposite that on which pressure is applied and bone growth on the same side.
2. An externally worn leg support needed when a leg is unstable from muscle weakness or joint disease, or a spinal support used to correct deformity such as SCOLIOSIS.

brace

(brās)
An orthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position any movable part of the body and that allows motion of the part.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. bracchium, arm, fr. G. brachion]
References in periodicals archive ?
To mount the SB47 to the AK or any other firearm that does not need or use a buffer tube requires the brace to be mounted on a buffer tube-like receiver extension.
I tell my patients to just try a brace out and see if it works for them because everyones body is going to respond differently.
The shocking lack of parental awareness is often revealed when parents approach a teacher before a concert or exam and mention that their child has just had braces put on or has an appointment scheduled to put them on--only then do they remember to ask whether it has an impact on the student's performance.
If need be, you can always go back to the first couple braces and make adjustments.
Craig Yehle, one of the most talented bow engineers I've met, once explained brace height to me, and the inherent torque related to it.
* Bottom line: Isolated grades 1 to 2 MCL injuries can be treated conservatively, and a hinged knee brace should be used as part of the rehabilitative process.
The NRS scores at rest (PAR, affected foot elevated) and under loading (PCL, walking while wearing shoes) before treatment were different between B/S Brace and nail extraction groups but without statistical significance (PAR: 2.143 [+ or -] 0.210 vs.
Son Jonathan Brace, 55, who runs the firm with brother Mark, said: "He will be missed by the family.
Given the clinical history and radiographic findings, we propose that the rigid design of the knee brace protects the knee but may transfer the force proximally, creating a stress riser for cantilever bending.
This appears to correlate with the demonstrated effect on peripheral proprioceptive input to the knee joint by means of a brace or sleeve, which seems to influence brain activity during knee movement, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the primary sensorimotor cortex and in the left superior parietal lobule of the brain (13).
nAs you exercise, check the brace occasionally to make sure that it hasn't slipped out of position.