adhesion

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adhesion

 [ad-he´zhun]
1. a fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere.
2. union of two surfaces that are normally separate, such as in wound healing or in some pathological process. Surgery within the abdomen sometimes results in adhesions from scar tissue; as an organ heals, fibrous scar tissue forms around the incision and may cling to the surface of adjoining organs. Adhesions are usually painless and cause no difficulties, but occasionally they produce pain, with or without obstruction or malfunction, by distorting the organ. They can also occur following peritonitis and other inflammatory conditions. They may occur in the pleura, in the pericardium, and around the pelvic organs, in addition to the abdomen. Surgery is sometimes required to release symptomatic adhesions.
3. artificial joining of two things, such as the bonding of materials to a tooth.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn),
1. The process of adhering or uniting of two surfaces or parts, especially the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound. Synonym(s): adhesio, conglutination (1)
2. In the pleural and peritoneal cavities, inflammatory bands that connect opposing serous surfaces; the direct result of trauma or inflammation of the serosal surfaces.
3. Physical attraction of unlike molecules for one another.
4. Molecular attraction existing between the surfaces of bodies in contact.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

adhesion

(ăd-hē′zhən)
n.
1. The act or state of sticking together.
2. A condition in which body tissues that are normally separate grow together.
3. A fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures.
4. The union of opposing surfaces of a wound, especially in healing.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Adhesion

The stable joining of parts to each other, or the union of 2 opposing tissue surfaces, which may be normal or abnormal.
Chemistry The property of remaining in close proximity, as that resulting from the physical attraction of molecules to a substance or the molecular attraction existing between surfaces.
Haematology See Platelet adhesion.
Surgery Synechia A collagen-rich fibrous band, scar, or stricture which forms after an intervention in a surgical field, classically in the peritoneal cavity after abdominal surgery or laparotomy; gentle manipulation of the organs and removal of blood minimises adhesive band formation.
Aetiology Adhesions are caused by suppression of fibrinolytic activity, focal decrease in plasminogen activator in the serosal lining or to local inflammation or infection.
Clinical findings May be severe enough to cause bowel obstruction, pelvic pain and infertility.
Factors in surgical adhesion formation:
• Port wound above site of dissection
• Ischaemia
• Drying of serosal surfaces
• Excessive suturing
• Omental patches
• Traction of peritoneum
• Retained blood clots, stones or dead tissue
• Prolonged operation
• Visceral injury
• Infection
• Delayed postoperative mobilisation of patient
• Postoperative pain due to inadequate analgesia
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

adhesion

The stable joining of parts to each other, or the union of 2 opposing tissue surfaces, which may be normal or abnormal Hematology See Platelet adhesion Surgery Synechia A collagen-rich fibrous band, scar, or stricture, that forms after an intervention in a surgical field, classically in the peritoneal cavity after abdominal surgery or laparotomy; adhesions may be related to a focal ↓ in plasminogen activator in the mesothelial lining or to local inflammation or infection; gentle manipulation of the organs and removal of blood minimizes adhesive band formation, which may be severe enough to cause intestinal obstruction; nothing effectively prevents adhesions. See Violin string adhesions.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn)
1. The adhering or uniting of two surfaces or parts, especially the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound or adjacent layers of fascia.
Synonym(s): conglutination (1) .
2. In the pleural or peritoneal cavity, inflammatory bands that connect opposing serous surfaces.
3. Mutual attraction of unlike molecules.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

adhesion

1. Abnormal union between body surfaces or other tissues. Adhesions do not occur if tissues are healthy and retain intact epithelial coverings. But if the ‘non-stick’ surfaces are deficient or diseased, the underlying tissue will readily heal together. Adhesions between peritoneum and bowel are common following abdominal surgery. These are the result of failure of physiological removal of fibrin (fibrinolysis) following injury to the mesothelial cell monolayer forming the peritoneum.
2. A fibrous band holding together normally separate bodily parts.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

adhesion

ability of substances, for example cells, molecules, to stick (adhere) together.
  1. In mammalian systems, cell to cell binding may involve calcium-dependent adhesion molecules, such as CADHERINS and INTEGRINS; calcium-independent binding mediated by proteins of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN family and cell to cell surface carbohydrate-binding proteins, SELECTINS. Adhesion of cells to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX is mediated by calcium- and magnesium-dependent binding of integrins.
  2. Microbial adhesion may be non-specific, involving electrostatic interactions between the bacterium and host cell surfaces; or specific, involving recognition of receptors on the surface of host cells by molecules called ADHESINS. This type of adhesion is often a prelude to COLONIZATION of the host by the bacterium and PATHOGENICITY.
  3. Attraction of unlike molecules to each other, such as that between water and the walls of a XYLEM VESSEL in plants.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Adhesion

The joining or sticking together of parts of an organ that are not normally joined together.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

synechia

Adhesion of parts of the body. In the eye it refers to the iris. Note: also spelt synechiae.
annular synechia Adhesion of the entire pupillary margin of the iris to the capsule of the crystalline lens. Syn. ring synechia. See iris bombé; pupillary block.
anterior synechia Adhesion of the iris to the cornea. It may give rise to angle-closure glaucoma. Syn. goniosynechia (if at the AC angle). See inflammatory glaucoma; indentation gonioscopy; prolapse of the iris; Peter's anomaly; Rieger's syndrome.
posterior synechia Adhesion of the iris to the capsule of the crystalline lens. See iris bombé; iritis; uveitis.
ring synechia See annular synechia.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ad·he·sion

(ad-hē'zhŭn)
Process of binding to a surface or binding two surfaces using chemical bonds or micromechanical interlocks.
Synonym(s): adhesio.
[L. adhaesio,, fr. adhaereo, to stick to]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dense bowel adhesions and ureteric obstructions are recognized late complications following recovery from barium induced peritonitis.
The relationship between adhesions and pelvic pain is unclear, although severe bowel adhesions can cause visceral pain.
Specifically, the patients with midline incision extending above the umbilicus were more likely to have bowel adhesions, when compared with these with either Pfannenstiel or lower midline incision.
When bowel adhesions are severe, use alternative trocar sites such as the left upper quadrant (Palmer's point) for the Veress needle and primary trocars.
Bowel adhesions CT-ileo-caecal around ileo- mass s/o caecal mass tuberculosis USG-RIF lump 4.