bouton


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bouton

 [boo-taw´] (Fr.)
button.
bouton terminal [ter-mĭ-nahl´] (pl. pl. boutons´ terminaux´) end-foot.

bou·ton

(bū-tōn[h]'),
A button, pustule, or knoblike swelling.
[Fr. button]

bouton

/bou·ton/ (boo-tahn´) [Fr.] a buttonlike swelling on an axon where it has a synapse with another neuron.
synaptic bouton  b. terminal.
bouton terminal  (ter-mĭ-nahl´) pl. boutons´ terminaux´  a buttonlike terminal enlargement of an axon that ends in relation to another neuron at a synapse.

bouton

[bo̅o̅tôN′, bo̅o̅′ton]
Etymology: Fr, button
1 a button, pustule, or knoblike swelling, such as the expanded end of an axon at a synapse (terminaux) which comes into contact with cell bodies of other neurons.
2 a lesion associated with cutaneous leishmaniasis.
3 a small abscess of the intestinal mucosa in amebic dysentery.

bou·ton

(bū-tōn[h]')
A button, pustule, or knoblike swelling.
[Fr. button]

bouton

A swelling or thickening, especially on the skin.

bouton

see SYNAPTIC KNOB.

axon 

The threadlike process of a neuron which conducts nerve impulses from the cell body to the neuron's ending (bouton) where it is transmitted via a synapse to another neuron, muscle or gland. Syn. nerve fibre (when it is sheathed). See neuron; synapse.

neuron

Structural unit of the nervous system consisting of the nerve cell body and its various processes, the dendrites, the axon and the ending (also called bouton, end foot or axon terminal). There are many types of neurons within the nervous system; some transmit afferent nerve impulses to the brain (e.g. those carrying information from the photoreceptors to the visual cortex), or to the spinal cord (e.g. those carrying information from the receptors in the skin to the spinal cord). They are called sensory neurons. Others transmit efferent motor nerve impulses to a muscle (e.g. those carrying information from the Edinger-Westphal nucleus to the sphincter pupillae and ciliary muscles). These are called motor neurons. Other neurons carry nerve impulses from one neuron to another (internuncial neurons). Note: also spelt neurone. See action potential; synapse.

bou·ton

(bū-tōn[h]')
A button, pustule, or knoblike swelling.
[Fr. button]

bouton

[Fr.] button.

bouton terminal
the swollen end of an axon that contributes to a synapse.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's more than a diary," Bouton told me as he leaned back on the living room couch in his home, tucked in snowy mountains about 45 minutes south of Pittsfield.
In his book, Bouton contends his proposal never got up to bat because of opposition from the Eagle, which he claims deceived voters about elements of both his plan and the new-stadium proposal.
Now living in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, Bouton has finally stopped pitching, but he still has plenty to say, as a motivational speaker and writer who's about to release his fourth book.
Bouton & Swartzentruber, 1986; Callejas-Aguilera & Rosas, 2010) or they formed a configure with discriminative stimuli to control behavior (e.
Particularly, Rosas and Bouton (1997) found ABA renewal with a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) procedure, whereas Rosas, Garcia-Gutierrez and Callejas-Aguilera (2007) reported AAB and ABA renewal.
I am completely determined to continue with our strategy because, even taking into account our very bad last year due to the financial crisis and this fraud, it's this strategy which creates and will create the most value for shareholders," Bouton said.
Bouton es un reconocido investigador en el campo de la psicologia basica del aprendizaje y la memoria.
Political pressure to make Mr Bouton the scapegoat of the affair had been growing and the decision means the 15-strong board has now twice given its backing to the chief executive.
Mr Bouton dismissed similarities between the fall of Barings and its own fraud case.
While it may be modestly sized, the show plays up its strengths as it builds for the future, Bouton says.
The plate - A 13 - was first issued in 1904 to a De Dion Bouton and has been in the same family ever since.
JIM BOUTON, on why everybody looked up to Billy Martin: "So would you if someone kept knocking you down.