bound

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bound

(bownd),
1. Limited; circumscribed; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance, such as iodine, phosphorus, calcium, morphine, or some other drug, which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.
3. Fixed to a receptor, such as on a cell membrane.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bound

(B, BD) (bownd)
1. Limited; circumscribed; attached; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance, such as iodine, phosphorus, calcium, morphine, or some other drug, which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bound

(bownd)
1. Limited; circumscribed; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about bound

Q. My friend has Progressive MS, he is bound to a wheelchair, Prognosis? How can I help? He must be moved by a Hoyer Lift, he has caregivers. He has a beautiful voice and does have enough ability to move in his chair around local community. He has some bad days with spacicity, I want to help but am unsure as to how? He is 60? or so and lives on his own, he has had MS for many years and a number of complications, such as pneumonia and decubitus. Please help me to help him!

A. There are a number of ideas and resources for social and recreational activities (i.e. wheelchair sports, dancing, travel, aviation, etc.) that may be helpful, which can be found at www.mobility-advisor.com.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Let [Y.sub.j] denote the number of partitioning boxes that intersect the bounding box of [P.sub.j].
We partition the objects of [Laplace]' into classes [C.sub.0], [C.sub.1], ..., [C.sub.k], where objects in class [C.sub.i] have bounding box size in the range ([[Alpha].sub.avg] [2.sup.i-1], [[Alpha].sub.avg] [2.sup.i]], for 1 [is less than or equal to] i [is less than or equal to] log [[Alpha].sub.avg].
where [b.sub.i] = vol(b([P.sub.i])) is the volume of [P.sub.i]'s bounding box.
Finally, let [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] denote the number of bounding box intersections among the large objects.
The largest bounding box among the small objects has size [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Let [B.sub.1], [B.sub.2], ..., [B.sub.k] denote the boxes in this tiling that cover the portion of the plane occupied by the bounding boxes of [Laplace]'.
(In the first inequality, [b.sub.t] denotes the bounding box volume of a large object.) Therefore,
We will estimate the number of bounding box pair intersections among these sets.