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bounded

The limitation of a system’s behaviour to a region of state space; bounded signals cannot have behaviour that approaches infinity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Huang, "Experiment of boundedly rational route choice behavior and the model under satisficing rule," Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, vol.
which is boundedly invertible for sufficiently small h as we have seen in the proof of Lemma 3.2.
On average, the relative output loss ([y.sup.RE] - [y.sup.HET])/[y.sup.RE] because 0f boundedly rational heterogeneous expectations is about 1.4%, with a peak of almost 3 %.
This analysis presents an argument in support of overconfidence on the part of borrowers as a predictor of "boundedly rational choice" (Conlisk 1996), indicating that use is more commonly noted among those who overestimate their own understanding of financial markets, holding conditions of relative need constant.
(84) And in a market filled with boundedly rational consumers, technology increasingly enables sellers to pinpoint opportunities to raise prices due to behavioral biases.
know only that citizens are boundedly rational; to help them, they also
The evolutionary school, for example, stresses the importance of boundedly rational decision making and local search.
Many families exhibit rational behaviors in the school choice process, but these behaviors are perhaps more accurately described as "boundedly rational" than perfectly rational.
Finally, we assume that both owners and stewards are boundedly rational (Simon, 1945).
We conclude that boundedly rational consumers adopt "buy low, sell high" heuristics when confronting a complex trade-off.
RVHI is able to help boundedly rational consumers to more rationally allocate their resources between medical care and other desirable goods and services, and can rationalize the amount of resources allocated to medical care (Gligor, 2011) without driving a wedge between the interests of physicians and patients.