drift

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drift

 [drift]
1. slow movement away from the normal or original position.
2. a chance variation, as in gene frequency from one generation to another; the smaller the population, the greater are the random variations.
antigenic drift relatively minor changes in the antigenic structure of a virus strain, probably resulting from natural selection of variants circulating among an immune or partially immune population. See also antigenic shift.
ulnar drift ulnar deviation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

drift

(drift),
1. A gradual movement, as from an original position.
2. A gradual change in the value of a random variable over time as a result of various factors, some random and some systematic effects of trend, manipulation, etc.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

drift

Orthopedics See Pronator drift Virology Antigenic drift, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drift

(drift)
1. A gradual movement, as from an original position.
2. A gradual change in the value of a random variable over time as a result of various factors, some random and some systematic effects of trend or manipulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

drift

see RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

drift

(drift)
In dentistry, movement of teeth usually medially due to loss of adjacent teeth or wear of proximal surfaces.
Synonym(s): mesial drift, migrating teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Geological features such as coal measures overlaying boulder clay and outcrop of sandstone cliff.
The piles of compacted boulder clay formed by glacial action.
There are three sandy beaches and boulder clay and peat on Brownsman, Staple Island, Inner Farne and West Wideopens accommodate plants.
The site contained sand, gravel, rock and boulder clay, deposited by glaciers 15,000 years ago, and which could be used in the construction.

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