bougie


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bougie

 [boo´zhe]
a slender, flexible or rigid, hollow or solid, cylindrical instrument for introduction into the urethra or other tubular organ, usually for calibrating or dilating constricted areas.
Bougies: A, Otis bougie à boule; B, olive-tipped bougie; C, filiform bougie. From Dorland's, 2000.
filiform bougie a bougie of very slender caliber, generally used for exploration of small areas, such as sinus tracts, where false tracts could be easily created. The entering end is of smaller diameter, and the following end is threaded to allow for attachment of a following bougie.
following bougie a flexible, tapered bougie attachable to a filiform bougie and allowing progressive dilatation without creation of false tracts.
Hurst b's a series of mercury-filled tubes of progressive diameter used for dilatation of the cardioesophageal region.
Maloney b's a series of mercury-filled tubes of progressive diameter, having cone-shaped tips.
soluble bougie a bougie composed of a substance that becomes fluid in situ.

bou·gie

(bū-zhē'),
A cylindric instrument, usually somewhat flexible and yielding, used for calibrating or dilating constricted areas in tubular organs, such as the urethra or esophagus; sometimes containing a medication for local application.
[Fr. candle]

bougie

(bo͞o′zhē, -jē)
n.
Medicine
a. A slender, flexible, cylindrical instrument that is inserted into a bodily canal, such as the urethra, to dilate, examine, or medicate.

bougie

Surgery A long, flexible instrument, introduced into the urethra, esophagus, etc, to remove obstructions Therapeutics A slender rod consisting of medicine in a vehicle–wax, gelatin that melts at body temperature, which is introduced via the urethra

bou·gie

(bū-zhē')
A cylindric instrument, usually somewhat flexible and yielding, used for calibrating, examining, measuring, or dilating constricted areas in tubular organs, such as the urethra or esophagus; sometimes containing a medication for local application.
[Fr. candle]

bougie

A smooth, often flexible, round-ended instrument used to widen abnormal narrowing (strictures) in a body passage, such as those in the URETHRA or OESOPHAGUS.

Bougie

A mercury-filled dilator in the shape of a cylinder or tapered cylinder. Bougies come in a range of different sizes.
Mentioned in: Lower Esophageal Ring
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past 15 years of sleeve gastrectomy experience, some technical details, such as bougie size, could not be standardized.
Bleeding can also cause impairment of glottis visualisation and aspiration, which can be prevented by passing a bougie first atraumatically and threading the endotracheal tube over it.
The 5 RCTs included in our review enrolled a total of 461 patients, including 197 bougie and 264 balloon dilations.
Elazary, "The effects of bougie caliber on leaks and excess weight loss following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.
Calibration tube size remains a debated topic among bariatric surgeons, with the consensus panel recommending a bougie size between 32 Fr and 40 Fr [5].
The guidewire allows the anterior knife edge of the outer tube to excise the stricture and to reach the opposite bougie. There is an external immobilizer at the posterior end of the guide.
The patients' charts were reviewed and the following data were obtained: gender, age at first dilatation, dilatation date, cause of stricture, maximum balloon or bougie size, time interval between serial dilatations, technical success and complications.
Bougie reminded in need to forward local time one hour as of midnight on 29-30 March 2014, the start of Daylight Saving Time." L.Y.R.
Face a la mort (il doit decider de sa participation ou non a la mission suicide le soir meme a minuit), le soldat s'isole et s'assoit, l'epee a la main, une bougie devant lui : le moment se fait vanite, au sens de ces tableaux evoquant la precarite de la vie humaine.
When considering tracheal intubation, the devices were classified into those which had an inbuilt conduit for the tracheal tube and those that required either a stylet or bougie.
Another story surfaced about a silver arm that was made for Admiral Barbarossa (1478 -1546), an Ottoman admiral who dominated the Mediterranean for decades, and fought the Spaniards in Bougie, Algeria, for a Turkish sultan.)
4 Le sommeil sur les cendres, apres la bougie soufflee.