bouffée

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bouffée

An obsolete nonspecific term for a transient attack, crisis or episode.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paulax Used to be known to some as Mrs Bouffant." (sic) Her former teacher at Shelfield Community Academy, in Pelsall, said Paula will keep up the tradition of larger than life locals Ruth Badger and Jo Cameron, who made their names battling it out to become Sir Alan Sugar's protege.
"If I open my mouth," Bouffant read aloud, "the pyramid will fall down." She read the note again in silence, then looked up furiously.
Some teased their hair into bouffant hairdos and wore too much makeup.
The wave of colors almost overtakes me: Women in red, fuschia, purple and turquoise grand boubous with matching head ties and beautiful, intricately braided hairstyles, and men in elegant, embroidered white caftans, bouffant pantaloons, turbans and tasseled fezzes.
There, the Minions pledge allegiance to bouffant super-villain Scarlet Overkill (voiced by Sandra Bullock) and her inventor husband Herb (Jon Hamm), who are plotting to steal the Crown Jewels from Queen Elizabeth II (Jennifer Saunders).
Of course, the bouffant is best suited to the vintage 60s look, so think pencil skirts, simple straight dresses and beautiful earrings.
When I was 20 I didn't have a care, just clothes and shoes and silly bouffant hair.
The elder daughter of F1 mogul Bernie Ecclestone looked sensational with bouffant hair, reminiscent of Raquel Welch's mane on the poster for 1966 film 'One Million Years B.C'.
WITH his penchant for billowing silk shirts and equally big bouffant hair, Michael Flatley was never known for being a heart-throb.
Eleanor will long be remembered for her gracious smile, bouffant hair, hard work, and famous homemade deserts.
Before he revolutionised the industry in the 1960s, British women really did have their hair dressed - a visit to the salon usually involved having their locks set in curlers, teased into a bouffant and then lacquered solid.