horsetail

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A branching shoot that contains alkaloids, flavonoids, minerals, saponins, silica, and tannins; it is antimicrobial, astringent, diuretic, and hemostatic, and has been used topically for cuts and internally to treat anemia, atherosclerosis, bedwetting, brittle nails and hair, fatigue, fractures, gastric ulcers, kidney stones, prostatitis, respiratory infections—e.g., tuberculosis—urinary tract infections, rheumatic complaints, and other conditions
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

horse·tail

(hōrs'tāl)
(Equisetum arvense) An herbal remedy purported to have value in wound healing and other internal uses; serious adverse reactions have been reported after its use.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

horsetail

see EQUISETUM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It was equally important that the fuchsia and bottlebrush cuttings accompanied us.
Nearly all the ornamentals identified as being non-preferred in choice tests, and further evaluated in 'starvation' tests (i.e., coontie, poinsettia, tropical sage, bottlebrush, cymbidium orchid, bush daisy, firespike, weeping lantana, and scarlet rose mallow) would be suitable recommendations for planting where eastern lubber grasshopper was a threat.
Fagg, Bottlebrushes, Paperbarks and Tea Trees and All Other Plants in the Leptospermum Alliance, Angus and Rovertson, Sydney, Australia, 1993.
"It then came forward and grabbed the bottlebrush and jetted backwards, leaving two arms on the bottlebrush.
Further chapters discuss Xanthorrhoea grass tree medicines with descriptions of early botanical collections in Australia, the medical resource of grass tree resin and its uses as a food, fuel and varnish; floral emissaries covering areas such as Banks' Florilegium naming the genus Eucalyptus, Australian carnivorous plants, bottlebrush, Telopea, Banksia, Grevillea and Hakea.
This lovely grass is a favorite, distinguished by arching, feathery bottlebrush flowers spilling over a cascading mound of foliage (Anonymous, 2007).
At stake is the future of Australia's valuable plant assets--not only commercial crops, but iconic native plants such as bottlebrush and willow myrtle.
By James PressleyBRUSSELSAuJohn Maynard Keynes, the English economist with the bottlebrush mustache, has been celebrated, appropriated, mocked and rediscovered, says historian Peter Clarke.
Those trees should be under-planted with woodies like serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis), bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora), arrow-wood (Viburnum dentatum), hazelnut (Corylus americanus), and blueberries (Vaccinium spp).
They also will be surrounded by more than 1,100 shrubs (including dramatic and less-common varieties such as bottlebrush buckeye) and nearly 13,000 individual groundcover plants (such as ferns, heuchera, sedges, and ajuga).
They include: bottlebrush buckeye, American beautyberry, red twig dogwood, strawberry bush, oakleaf hydrangea, Virginia sweetspire, eastern red cedar and inkberry, just to name a few.
Mucins are elongated, rod-like molecules called subunits (monomers) comprising a protein backbone to parts of which oligosaccharide side-chains are attached (the bottlebrush regions), the rest being 'naked' or free of carbohydrate.